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Switching to Telemark NTN - what to expect?

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  • Switching to Telemark NTN - what to expect?

    Hi all,

    great to see a nice forum for all us ski bums! So, I've been slalom skiing for 30+ years, then switched to Telemark 5-6 years ago. It was very hard starting from scratch again, but worth all the pain and effort. I love it. After renting for a few years I've decided to buy my own gear. However, I've only used the 'old' system, so now that I'm buying new gear it will be the NTN system.

    I'm getting:

    Boots: Scarpa Pro TX
    Bindings: 22 Designs Outlaw
    Skis: Salomon QTS 92

    I'm picking them all up next week. I'm not walking uphill, just skiing down, so that has been my priority when selecting gear. I selected the 22 designs binding after reading all reviews; it seems to be the binding with the most authentic 'feel' to it, which is way more important than looks et.c. Don't know yet if it will deliver, but I hope so.

    Now to my questions:
    • The sales guy said that you don't bend your knees as much with NTN, or basically don't go as deep. Is that true?
    • As for the brakes: I've used the 'leash' through these years, but am annoyed that the skis might smack me in the head when I fall over. So a brake would be nice. I see that they come as an optional feature with the Outlaw. I'm keen on getting it because of the convenience, but does it really get in the way? Some people report it being in the way for certain turns, as it doesn't retract like brakes on slalom skis.
    • Overall, is there a big difference when telemarking using NTN, or should I feel fairly familiar on the first run? Very curious about this one.


    Any input/help is appreciated.

    Cheers, Henrik

  • #2
    Hello, Henrick. No NTN experience, so no answers to your specific questions, but a general suggestion for something to do before our helpful moderator does--copy and paste this over to the general forum, "Backside Bar & Grill." It gets way more attention than these sub-forums, which get far fewer views.
    nee, Whiteout

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Henrik View Post
      Now to my questions:
      • The sales guy said that you don't bend your knees as much with NTN, or basically don't go as deep. Is that true?
      • As for the brakes: I've used the 'leash' through these years, but am annoyed that the skis might smack me in the head when I fall over. So a brake would be nice. I see that they come as an optional feature with the Outlaw. I'm keen on getting it because of the convenience, but does it really get in the way? Some people report it being in the way for certain turns, as it doesn't retract like brakes on slalom skis.
      • Overall, is there a big difference when telemarking using NTN, or should I feel fairly familiar on the first run? Very curious about this one.
      Caveat: I've tried NTN for less than 10 days. Others here can provide greater insights. That being said:

      1. I don't think that's necessarily true. If you ski low, then yeah, you probably won't go as low. But lots of folks ski 75mm tall. So I guess it depends on your current style.

      2. No comment other than Outlaw is improving itself with the Outlaw X for next year. That may make the brake issue much smaller.

      3. Again, depends. I know a few who made the switch seamlessly and absolutely love it. I know some who said it took them a few days and then they loved it. And then there's me -- I didn't care for the underclaw attachment and stiff retention. I guess I like a little more flop.

      You will soon be able to answer these questions for your own self better than anyone else here . . . so enjoy.

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      • #4
        1) you can't go knee-to-ski on Rottefella, but on Outlaw I do not really know. I think the travel itself will be mostly enough; my observation is that with TX Pros you will not want to go too deep as the boots aren't supportive enough. Crispi Evos are another story, I go deeper in 'em because of support and resulting feel of security.

        2) if brake is made crude (as in Rottefella and Meidjo) and brake legs won't retract inside and will only lift up, then I'd say B&D leashes are better option. But I tend to have very, very narrow stance - half of one ski above another.

        3) pay all attention you can to weighting skis 50%/50%, pinky and pressuring the cuff (not bending the ankle!!!). Always have your hands so that you can see them in your peripheral vision, and do that gentle pole plant. Bend and angulate right, and you'll discover that NTN is superior not only in edge control. IMO given that You dial in perfect (not poodling back, not striding forward) lead change, upper body and what was said above, then the best way is to ski both skis as if it's one ski, e.g. ski on two legs as if it's one leg.
        I like all kinds of snow. The only poor snow I know of is ice. That better be climbed.

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        • #5
          Hi Henrik, I switched to NTN last year and love it. I've been a tele guy for many many years, but was an alpine skier in a past life. I have the 22D Outlaws and the Rottefella Freerides. Freerides on my daily driver (mostly resort) and the Outlaws on my powder/touring skis. I'm a pretty agro skier and love the NTN solid feel, wether tele turns or parallel turning. The brakes on the Outlaw suck. And are a pain in the rear to step into. If your are not backcountry touring, I would have recommended the Freerides. They are just easier to deal with if you are lift served. And yes, it is true you don't need to bend your knees as much as with a 75mm duckbill, but I would disagree with Combiner as far as what you can do. I also have the TX Pros and I can get way down, knee on the board low if I want to. I feel like I have great control in all positions. My first day on NTN's, I wanted to throw everything in the dumpster at the end of the day. I thought I had made a huge mistake. A week later, I was all smiles and never looked back.

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          • #6
            Depends what kit you had pre NTN.
            I have only had a couple of days on Freerides, but found they tele skied about the same as my Axls on more active setting. Freerides did Apline turn better though. Outlaws would be my choice for NTN piste bashing.

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            • #7
              I switched to NTN this season with the Outlaw, without having ever demo'd an ntn setup, and was pleasantly surprised at the ease of the transition. I expected it to be a much different feel, but it was not hard to dial it in, IMO. I have been on tele skis for almost 20 years. My current 75mm setup is a G3 zenoxide 105 w/ voile switchback X2 & Scarpa T2X. I love the TXpro/Outlaw combo, and the lateral control is amazing. You just have to think about bringing the tails in, and it is done!

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