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  • TX Pros folding/deforming.

    It was pretty warm today, above freezing and I’m wondering if that was a contributing factor, but my TXPros were deforming and folding just above the bellows. It was hurting my feet to the point I was glad when the day ended.

    From the start I’ve found the TXPros to have a little more volume than would be my preference. (Mentioned before). I’ve added footbeds and gone with thicker socks, but it seems when it gets to the point of ratcheting up the buckles, the boot looses shape.

    IIRC, it was suggested on here that the Intiition Luxury liners are the solution to my problem. I’m ready to bite the bulletin and get a pair (was kinda hoping new boots would be the solution but can’t wait forever!)

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by Dostie; 18 March 2019, 02:45 PM.

  • #2
    So you think the "over buckling" distorts the boot shape and is adding to the propensity for the boot to deform under pressure?... It could be part of it.

    Back in the old garmont days, their boots were very high volume. I used to put bontex shims under my liner, so that I could get pressure on my foot and not be on the last tooth of every buckle. They are good to take up volume in boots You can get the bontex shims from tognar. I used 3M double sized tape to stick the bontex shims to my boot shell permanantly. If fact when I sold those boots I forgot to take them out... lol

    The other thing I did was rethermoform my liners and duct tape a "credit card" type material inside the boot to block the liner's expansion into the belows during thermofitting. This way the belows space is empty, so when the belows collapses as the boot flexes, it doesn't push the liner downward.

    I'm sure you don't want to hear anything about technique, so I'll spare you...
    the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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    • #3
      It sounds like a case of excess volume in your boot shell. Find a higher volume liner boot and use either bontex shims or 5 iron boot shims. This is standard boot fitting 102 stuff. When thermo molding the liners use thinnest plastic bag you can find to put the liner boot in before inserting it into the shell with your footbed in the liner. When you get your foot in the boot with a super thin sock and toe cap under the sock, just buckle the boot loosely especially in the forefoot. The boot should be uncomfortably tight in the toe box while you’re molding them with a generous toe cap under your sock. Sit in your chair, prop your foot up on the heel, calf at a 45 degree bend from the knee and put your foot/ leg in subtalar neutral position with ankle, knee and hip in a straight alignment. Sit like this for 5+ minutes, then get up and walk around and maybe snug up the cuff buckle a bit.

      You might look into the Scarpa Precision High Liner. It’s a high volume overlap liner that fills the TXP shell or any of the 102mm last shells very well. Combine that with enough footbed shims and you should be able to get a good fit without the shell collapsing on your foot.
      Function in disaster, finish in style.

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      • #4
        And of course, consider the tried and true plastic milk jug/flower pot cover piece taped on to your liner directly under the bellows
        #oldschooler

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jnicol View Post
          It was pretty warm today, above freezing and I’m wondering if that was a contributing factor, but my TXPros were deforming and folding just above the bellows. It was hurting my feet to the point I was glad when the day ended.

          From the start I’ve found the TXPros to have a little more volume than would be my preference. (Mentioned before). I’ve added footbeds and gone with thicker socks, but it seems when it gets to the point of ratcheting up the buckles, the boot looses shape.

          IIRC, it was suggested on here that the Intiition Luxury liners are the solution to my problem. I’m ready to bite the bulletin and get a pair (was kinda hoping new boots would be the solution but can’t wait forever!)

          Thoughts?
          I have a pair of Intuition Luxury liners and IMO, it is good liner for a alpine boot or 100% resort tele boot but not a good choice for a touring or combo resort/touring liner. It is very stiff in the cuff and would impede ROM for hiking up. I think a good choice would be a Pro tour liner and get the HV option. This would be stiffer than a stock Scarpa liner and has baffles for hiking up. HV meaning designed to reduce space in the shell. IMO
          "Just say no to groomed snow"

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the suggestions.

            Was out today and it was about -15C vs +2C yesterday. Boots felt fine. So the plastic is soft and when it gets warm, they soften further... and deform. Hence why so many of you who own both Pros and Comps ski the Comps.

            Think I'll try an under the liner shim to reduce volume and will talk to Intuition too.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hence why so many of you who own both Pros and Comps ski the Comps.
              Yes. I also think my TX Pros softened over time , too. You could try a pair of stiffer TX Comp tongues, in your TX Pros?
              Last edited by chamonix; 3 February 2019, 07:59 PM.

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              • #8
                I have the same issue as jnicol described in a pair of TX and would like to try out the "milk bottle trick". Procedure as pictured in post #9 in this thread - http://www.backcountrytalk.earnyourt...=plastic+milk?

                I just got a new pair of Crispi Evos for lift-served but hope to keep the TX for touring, which tends to be in warmer temps when the toe crunch gets worse.
                Last edited by ts01; 4 February 2019, 02:15 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I wondering if the boots are too big. Been skiing Pros and Comps for years, sometimes in hot weather, and never experienced this.

                  My friend recently got sold some too-big NTN boots at a store- the salesperson had him "try them on" (with liners) and was told not to heat mold them for a while until he at least skied them for a while. Jeez.
                  Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If it were a size issue, how would the temperature be a factor?

                    Fairly confident mine are not too big. I wear a 9.5 wide street shoe, and in the TX I've had both a 26.5 and 27.0 (same shell); the shell fit is 1 finger plus a little wiggle room, cannot get 2 fingers in. Wrap liner, no footbed because that's too tight.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ts01 View Post
                      If it were a size issue, how would the temperature be a factor?

                      Fairly confident mine are not too big. I wear a 9.5 wide street shoe, and in the TX I've had both a 26.5 and 27.0 (same shell); the shell fit is 1 finger plus a little wiggle room, cannot get 2 fingers in. Wrap liner, no footbed because that's too tight.
                      that sounds like the right size, although if it were going to happen I could see it happening only in warm weather whatever the cause was
                      Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, for me size is part of the equation. They are a touch roomy but I had the size smaller (27.0 then 27.5) and they were too short. I’d like to go back to the 27.0 and in fact tried them on again but my toes don’t sit flat. But at least with too big I can take up some volume with spacers/shims

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jnicol View Post
                          Well, for me size is part of the equation. They are a touch roomy but I had the size smaller (27.0 then 27.5) and they were too short. I’d like to go back to the 27.0 and in fact tried them on again but my toes don’t sit flat. But at least with too big I can take up some volume with spacers/shims
                          Did you try removing the factory footbed that comes with them? I had been using an awesome after-market footbed with the bigger size, but no footbed and smaller size fits better, seems equally comfortable on the up, and results in fewer days of toe crunch on the down than the bigger boots with the footbeds. Opinions will vary.

                          It's worth trying on both shells with your barefeet and using 1/2" and 3/4" dowels inserted behind the heels to compare fit.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dschane View Post
                            Did you try removing the factory footbed that comes with them? I had been using an awesome after-market footbed with the bigger size, but no footbed and smaller size fits better, seems equally comfortable on the up, and results in fewer days of toe crunch on the down than the bigger boots with the footbeds. Opinions will vary.

                            It's worth trying on both shells with your barefeet and using 1/2" and 3/4" dowels inserted behind the heels to compare fit.
                            Good point. After considering new liners I dug out my old 27.0s and tried both sizes on with bare feet. Using the finger test the 27.0 should fit and the 27.5 should be big, BUT once I get the liners in there the toes hit on the 27.0. IIRC, I found it was hard to hold my foot still in the 27.0 due to the mid foot volume being too great - and since my toes were close they would hit - and my heel developed a heel spur (before or after the boots, I don't know) so I ended up trying all sort of footbeds to hold my foot more stationary before buying the 27.5. The 27.5 have been more or less fine until now but I keep adding thicker footbeds and thicker socks. Pretty sure someone on here (or more than one person) said that the stock liners in these aren't as good as the ones from Intuition in terms of holding their shape. I think my liners are just done and I may as well get some new ones.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jnicol View Post
                              Good point. After considering new liners I dug out my old 27.0s and tried both sizes on with bare feet. Using the finger test the 27.0 should fit and the 27.5 should be big, BUT once I get the liners in there the toes hit on the 27.0. IIRC, I found it was hard to hold my foot still in the 27.0 due to the mid foot volume being too great - and since my toes were close they would hit - and my heel developed a heel spur (before or after the boots, I don't know) so I ended up trying all sort of footbeds to hold my foot more stationary before buying the 27.5. The 27.5 have been more or less fine until now but I keep adding thicker footbeds and thicker socks. Pretty sure someone on here (or more than one person) said that the stock liners in these aren't as good as the ones from Intuition in terms of holding their shape. I think my liners are just done and I may as well get some new ones.
                              Actually the Scarpa liners are superior to the over the counter stock Intuition liners. Intuition makes Scarpa liners but to Scarpa’s spec. The materials that Scarpa specs on their liners is of a higher quality than the normal over the counter Intuition liners.

                              jnicol, I personally think you need to get into some Scarpa Precision High (high volume) liners. Take your boots to a good bootfitter and have them order the right size liner and fit you properly. Just reading your posts about your own boot fitting woes makes me cringe. It’s no wonder you’re having issues. I can tell from your posts that you have a low volume (skinny fairly long foot) foot. I can't tell without measuring your feet unweighted and then weighted if you are longer heel to ball of foot or longer heel to toe or how much you foot elongates from unweighted to weighted. This is why you need a good bootfitter to help you get the proper fit and make volume adjustments to the shells and liners if needed and get you into a proper arch supportive footbed if that’s what’s called for. I guarantee if you find a good boot fitter it’ll be worth its weight in gold. But If you continue to just kind of fumble through boot fitting 101 you are going to continue to have issues. This is JMHO!
                              Last edited by Allan Fici; 4 February 2019, 07:24 PM.
                              Function in disaster, finish in style.

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