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Crispi Antarctic Boots

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  • Crispi Antarctic Boots

    I've found a source for these but I'm unsure if they will fit the bill.

    Anyone have any feedback on them?

    I'm particularly interested in ankle support and sole break in. Are they high enough and stiff enough in the heel/ankle to keep from rolling your ankle? And does that very rigid sole break in enough to keep heel lift at bay and provide a comfortable kick and glide without giving up too much torsional stiffness?

    I'm looking for a boot that will fill the spectrum between a soft, injection molded touring boot (Alpina Alaska) and a full plastic Excursion type. Ideally I'd like to acquire the whole range but I still feel the need for something in between those two.

    Thanks in advance for any insight.

    PS This is a repost from the gear section. Mods, please feel free to delete the original. Thanks.

  • #2
    Not sure what the Antarctic boot is. I picked up a pair of Crispi Svartisans this year that work quite nicely with Madshus Epochs and Altai Hoks both outfitted with 3 pin cable bindings. Decent mobility for kick and glide and enough lateral rigidity to manage some good turns in reasonable snow. Much more mobile than my 1st gen T3s and pretty reasonable downhill performance.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the feedback. The Antarctic boot is an old school leather - Norwegian welt. It has the highest cuff of any leather available that I know of. It looks to be padded on the back side (Achilles) to aid with kick extension but I'm still unsure how stable the ankle and heel are. Another forum member has a pair and said they were all leather - but I'm not sure he got what I was asking... most traditional leather ski boots that I have come across some sort of plastic endo-skeleton to give them some rigidity.
      Last edited by MikeK; 30 April 2014, 08:13 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MikeK View Post
        ...all leather - but I'm not sure he got what I was asking... most traditional leather ski boots that I have come across some sort of plastic endo-skeleton to give them some rigidity.
        Hey, no I understood. You were asking if there was a plastic layer within the leather "lay-up" of the boot.
        I tried feeling for one and did not find it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Uphill Plodder View Post
          I picked up a pair of Crispi Svartisans this year that work quite nicely with Madshus Epochs and Altai Hoks both outfitted with 3 pin cable bindings. Decent mobility for kick and glide and enough lateral rigidity to manage some good turns in reasonable snow. Much more mobile than my 1st gen T3s and pretty reasonable downhill performance.
          These look like great boots (scroll down to "backcountry"). Leather with some plastic augmentation and double straps. I'd serious consider these if I was looking to replace my old Merrill fuzion boots.

          cheers,
          JT

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JohnF View Post
            Hey, no I understood. You were asking if there was a plastic layer within the leather "lay-up" of the boot.
            I tried feeling for one and did not find it.
            OK thanks! That is odd to me. I guess I am going to move on from those.

            To me I don't see that there is much difference between the BCX875 and the Svartisens. They both have a similar cuff and straps; they both have a similar, if not the same Vibram sole; and they both are probably similarly durable (or not).

            The only thing that would sway one way or another is the fit, and I can't try them side by side so I might as well go for what's easily available, and that's the Fischer.

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            • #7
              I have had Crispi Antarctics for 5 years - replaced my wonderful, worn out Asolo Snowfields. This is not the same caliber boot. It is softer, more easily and quickly broken in but after 5 years the structural integrity of the toe box and forefoot is trash. It began collapsing instead of flexing and, on a long tour, it crushed my toes. I used them one more time to be sure it wasn't just a weird sock day and - NO - the structure of the boot is gone. I have replaced them with a pair of Scarpa Tours I found in my size which seem much more like the quality of the Snowfields. Breaking them in now and it may take a year!

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