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Axls resistance settings and stiffy springs

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  • Axls resistance settings and stiffy springs

    I've always skied my Axls in the medium resistance setting. That was before I bought 130 flex boots. Basically, I'm trying to break in the bellows on a new pair of BD Customs. On Sunday, I tried the stiffest setting on a hard snow day but couldn't tell the difference. So, I'm trying out the stiffy Axl springs. Anybody out there with a similar setup? Feedback appreciated.

  • #2
    Originally posted by snowbomb500 View Post
    I've always skied my Axls in the medium resistance setting. That was before I bought 130 flex boots. Basically, I'm trying to break in the bellows on a new pair of BD Customs. On Sunday, I tried the stiffest setting on a hard snow day but couldn't tell the difference. So, I'm trying out the stiffy Axl springs. Anybody out there with a similar setup? Feedback appreciated.
    i use medium spring with my shorter skiis and stiff spring with my wider , larger ski. both on medium setting underneath which i find smoother

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    • #3
      I skied the purple Customs for two years with the AXL in the middle setting. I agree with cliffb100 that this setting feels to have the smoothest and most progressive pull on the springs. I skied the AXL with the standard spring in position #2 on both my all mountain (105 waist) and fatter (120 waist) skis. I weigh 165.

      I find that position 3 increases the activity so much, and therefore the heel hold-down, that you are actually spending too much energy trying to activate the binding and progress through the spring travel. With this much resistance and activity, it also slows down the turn-to-turn transition.

      I firmly believe that you should not be using the binding or the activity point to break or bend the bellows of the boot. This should be the same regardless of spring or binding activity position (#1, 2, or 3). You should be able to break the bellows through stance and technique even on the most neutral binding by pressuring the cuff, and dropping butt to heel with a straight/tall back. This will prevent poodling and weight too far back, and centring your body over the bellows, thereby breaking it in a way that is blind to binding setup.

      Give it a try before spending money trying to mod your gear.

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