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Lite Spike with touring rig

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  • Lite Spike with touring rig

    I came across the Lite Spike through a discussion on Tele_east recently... That one seems like a very good all around binding; you can use it with pins only, with the single barrel heel attachment for more support, with the touring clip for a free pivot binding... But I am concerned about the pins going in and out of the sole pin holes with every stride in touring mode... Could that dammage the boot in the long run? Craig, have you tried the touring version?
    http://vimeo.com/78137341
    Last edited by Rodbelan; 11 November 2013, 09:46 AM.

  • #2
    Interesting, nice company. The website says it weights 1 lb, 12 oz. Is that for both bindings? I'd think so, but if no, I don't see that binding as saving weight. For comparison, the Voile 3-pin Mtnr bindings weigh just under 1 lb per pair. Voile Switchbacks weigh in at 3 lb per pair.

    I'd love to see a light 3-pin binding with a free pivot, but it seems to me that having to add the heel adds to the weight and increases the fiddle factor. (And while I'm writing my wish list, how about some mountaineering boots with toe tech fittings -- TTS could take a chunk of Silvretta's tiny business if that happened -- I have those Silvretta 500 Easy Go bindings, and they pre-release when I stare at them too hard).

    Rod, as for your question, I've read (no firsthand experience) that Spike's pins are bigger, fit more snuggly, and therefore cause less wear on the pinholes (though this assumes you line them up correctly -- most pinhole damage probably occurs from improper alignment). And you can likely find some Smiley plates to put on your boots to solve that problem.

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    • #3
      A free pivot binding requires a pivot, a lock and a way to switch back and forth; it seems like it has to weigh more than a minimalist classic 3-pin. It sounds like the Lite Spike falls somewhere near the middle in the weight gap between a an old school 3-pin and the Switchback--and probably in the middle for downhill performance. Likely a tiny niche in a tiny business, but more power to Burnt Mountain if they can generate some revenue filling it.
      Last edited by fogey; 12 November 2013, 10:53 AM.

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      • #4
        rodbelan,

        I reviewed the Spike system. The LiteSpike just uses a toe piece with more metal cut out, but retains the skeletal structure. It is lighter, but if you're planning to use the free-pivot capability I'm not sure it saves you that much weight overall. The reason is because you can't engage the free-pivot without using the spring tube to hold the boot in the toe piece from the heel. IOW, you can't use the free pivot with the pins in, only with the heel tube. So, you're right, if you could do a free pivot and the 3-pins you would chew up the duckbill of your boot, but the two are mutually exclusive....or should be, so don't force it.

        ain't no turn like tele!

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        • #5
          I've essentially skied this binding, it is a reworked Telebulldog and judging from the photos I don't see a noticeable difference in its function for the most part. I used them with T1s and Explosivs, a stiff ski, a stiff boot and a neutral binding, not a choice of gear I would go with these days. It worked fine, I had the tour version but those parts have since changed so I can't comment on switching modes. The pinholes on my boots got a little worked but they still functioned fine. Even if you could find smiley plates I wouldn't use them, I would be worried about the pins clunking in and out if they weren't aligned perfectly. Pinhole wear was not an issue for me.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dostie View Post
            rodbelan,
            IOW, you can't use the free pivot with the pins in, only with the heel tube. So, you're right, if you could do a free pivot and the 3-pins you would chew up the duckbill of your boot, but the two are mutually exclusive....or should be, so don't force it.
            In the relating video from Louis, he had them removed... otherwise I am not sure that they are meant to be mutually exclusive. Or maybe I just do not understand how it works! When I look closely, I do not see any mechanism that makes the pins recessing or ┬źdisappearing┬╗ in tour mode... I am interested in this binding for the multiple possiblities it offers for touring BC (not inbound) with a 80ish waist ski and T2...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by repete View Post
              I had the tour version but those parts have since changed so I can't comment on switching modes. The pinholes on my boots got a little worked but they still functioned fine. ...I would be worried about the pins clunking in and out if they weren't aligned perfectly. Pinhole wear was not an issue for me.
              Repete, am I understanding correctly that in free pivot tour mode, the pins are going in and out of the holes with every stride? Seems bizarre to me from an engineering stand point... It might work though... Or they might be easy to remove (not permenantly I hope).

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              • #8
                I couldn't watch the video from work, so I'm assuming that this is the older design with a 75mm toe, three "removeable pins", and a single spring tube?

                These bindings work fine, the pins can be removed, you'll want to use leashes to prevent runaways; of course even pins don't prevent runaways. The pins also prevent the toe from backing out of the toe box, which can happen with stiffer boots, low skiing, and low spring tension. The pins will dig holes in your sole, but it's not that big of deal.

                If you run sans spring tube, then you are essentially skiing a Bulldog, so of course you need the pins to keep the boot in the toebox.

                I have skied many versions of the Burnt Mountain bindings starting with the Bulldog and ending with the twin tube Spike, Louis is a great guy and he stands by his products, I still use his prototype TTS bases on my big skis.

                Repete, am I understanding correctly that in free pivot tour mode, the pins are going in and out of the holes with every stride? Seems bizarre to me from an engineering stand point... It might work though... Or they might be easy to remove (not permenantly I hope).
                Yes.
                Last edited by Nurse Ben; 12 November 2013, 07:31 AM.

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                • #9
                  Quick discussion of the NT version(s) of these bindings. I have not skied the Bulldogs with 75 mm boots, so I can't comment specifically on the Lite Spike binding with touring rig.

                  Here is the Spike NT bulldog binding from a year ago. Since the NTN boots have no natural pin holes in the boot toe, you have to always use them with a single barrel heel tube.
                  Note, there are no pins on the toe of this binding plate, (which make it easier to step in) but there are side "spikes" to retain the boot toe in the binding, when it is latched down. These spikes were tough on a boot sole so the later rounded tabs (see second last picture) were designed. Louis has left two threaded holes, in the brake tab (in first picture), where the boot toe sits, which can be used to thread in a small cap head bolt, for a tighter fit.

                  Of note is that all these Spike bindings now have a 6 hole mount, much more solid. This NT Spike Tour binding build below does not have the optional ski brakes.[IMG]

                  Here is a picture of the earlier NT Bulldog binding with tour mode and ski brakes. Note the three pins on the toe piece. I skied this setup, with my NTN Scarpa TX boots for years. While it "wore" some small detent holes in the toe of the boot, no big deal.
                  As an interim measure we ground down the head of these three pins a bit, so they would still "grip" the boot toe, but not protrude that far into the boot sole..

                  [IMG]


                  The newer NT Spike Bulldog also have rounded side tabs (not the "spikes" in first picture) that help retain the boot toe in the toe cage. See arrow in this picture below. This binding is latched fully down, so these side tabs are up.

                  This Tour binding build below , weighs 679 gms each, or 1 lb 8 ounces with the heel lifter (but without ski brake ). Picture on right shows range of motion in tour mode.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  The binding wear and tear on the boot sole is minor, as seen on my NTN Prophets below. These have been skied on NT Bulldogs with the old three pins, and the later NT Spike Bulldogs with both "spike" and the rounded side tabs.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Last edited by chamonix; 12 November 2013, 09:51 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chamonix View Post
                    ...Since the NTN boots have no natural pin holes in the boot toe, ...
                    huh?

                    56789

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                    • #11
                      I noticed a pair of BD 75 mm boots the other day without pin holes.

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