Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dynafit Ski Crampons with Heel Lifters

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dynafit Ski Crampons with Heel Lifters

    Anyone have a fix for not getting bite with the ski crampon when using the heel lifters? I've seen some little screws and nuts through the holes on the crampon to contact the boot sooner, but it seems you'd have to switch them out when you weren't using the lifters which could be tedious.

  • #2
    Anyone ever used the B and D locks? Looks like you can run them floating or locked... kinda nice !?!

    http://bndskigear.com/cramponlocks.html

    Comment


    • #3


      Here in Euroland /Alps, where we are using the ski crampons daily, and no one’s is bother of this. Basically, when you are a good skinner,you’re just using the mid climbing height of the Dynafit at all the time, this also gives you enough ski crampon penetration during any climb or any critical traverse.




      Last edited by Toby; 26th September 2015, 03:19 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        already found?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Toby View Post


          Here in Euroland /Alps, where we are using the ski crampons daily, and no one’s is bother of this. Basically, when you are a good skinner,you’re just using the mid climbing height of the Dynafit at all the time, this also gives you enough ski crampon penetration during any climb or any critical traverse.




          Although old, I remember writing this post, and it was written after a long day of skinning from Bunny Flats to the summit of Mt. Shasta. That's a climb of approx. 7k vertical through a bunch of different types of snow surfaces. I have bc skied in the alps, too, and this is very different as we were headed straight to the summit on mostly firm snow and had no opportunity to kick in a skin track that would maintain a low enough angle to keep only one heel lift. Partner and I are both reasonably competent skinners, so don't think that was an issue either.

          Started thinking a strong magnet on a puck of some sort might do the trick... will experiment this year.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's my solution. I used right-angle aluminum stock, stainless piano hinge, a drill, hacksaw, and grinder. It's not very elegant, but does the job. The notch in the aluminum is to clear the sole/duckbutt when down. When up, the boot rests on the ridge and wings of the aluminum. I mounted it on the hinge so it leans slightly forward when up (to avoid collapsing too easily, and to follow the angle of the boot).


            Click image for larger version  Name:	LuCPPD46JJPKGnvX7W2dMZLbzHK8llKsR9GZKwoAYPj3Gf7TEfvbEp4Y0FWDswYPnF-8VNfozDXevFMJBfGjl5VfM-zk76YHqjkhfQxcVzAdIwcvwST2vpbqn1VMp5_l7hXdIKe0-80=w800.jpg Views:	1 Size:	323.3 KB ID:	100869

            I counter-sunk the back of the crampon and used flat head screws so the crampon would lay flat.

            Click image for larger version  Name:	4xOTX3XUaFC7JfyrYWHgLzkIRr3d6iAsOtbItZtNWJOu6XcjVMtvxIQumFSwP94GGCAASu-6MiLSuop4QPr29SMF2Jp2qCiA1L3c9p2cxn4udA_lLWqJ1JlSnBTfCc-DOQzd1sanaD8=w800.jpg Views:	1 Size:	284.8 KB ID:	100870

            B&D makes something similar that might work in a TTS setup (the dual-height crampon): http://www.bndskigear.com/telemarkcrampons.html. I like that one better than the crampon lock because it allows the crampon to lift when your heel lifts (to let the ski slide), but still engages the crampon fully when your heel is down (on the lifter).
            Last edited by jtb; 11th March 2020, 08:02 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice work!

              Was just thinking about this the other day, would be nice for it to be easily removable.

              I need to set my shop back up and get back to tinkering.

              Comment

              Working...
              X