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Gorrilla Glue for bindings?

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  • #16
    This gorilla glue (wood glue, not polyurethane) is type II, same as Titebond II; it is supposed to be waterproof, but not as much as the III. The III gives the most solid bound. I used the Gorilla II many times with good result.

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    • #17
      How does a melamine-vinyl glue (Roo) fit into this discussion? That's what Tognar sells, and I've been using it for many years (30+ mounts) with no issues. And apparently water is not categorically evil.

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      • #18
        Titebond II is "supposed" (meaning the mfgr says so...but per some ANSI def.) to be water RESISTANT. Type III is supposed to be waterproof, but at the same time, not intended for continuous immersion. What is the ANSI definition of "waterproof"? Probably a measure of months exposed to water at a hydrostatic pressure at X meters below surface. Right off the top I see these are skis, not submarines. Well or kayaks even. Ergo water resistant enough.
        [EDIT to add a failure, since we learn of our process adequacies only from failures, not "none yet." I pulled a very rusted screw once. It was from a simple three pin rat-trap. In those days I mounted with elmers, per some suggestion. I SUSPECT Elmers not good enough at withstanding flexing and water.]
        Last edited by Charley White; 16 February 2020, 12:18 PM.
        nee, Whiteout

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        • #19
          ... but also you have to remember if you have a 3 screw mount like an old 3 pin binding, (without setting the binding plate in an epoxy bed) then all the latteral force goes directly to the screws. This creates enough play around the screw/ski interface to allow water to penetrate to the ski core. Back in the day I used epoxy to mount 3 pin bindings and when the binding would get loose eventually, I would inspect the screw holes before remounting the binding, and the holes were "ovalized" in all directions and could barely hold the binding in place. I never ripped a binding out because I always noticed the excessive play in the way the ski handled before rip out occurred, but there were some times where rip out was probably just 1 more run away from occurring.

          As charlie said, it's a ski not a submarine or a kyack. Probably most glues will be sufficient enough to work for a long time. It's probably more important to have a 6 hole binding mount and execute it properly, than it is to have chosen the "best glue" of the bunch. Which means even just a polyurethane glue would work fine if the mount is well done and the core is made of some substantial core material.

          Personally, I use glass resin because it sets up rock hard and I can paint the ski's surface under the binding with a light coat, so the force driven through the binding when I'm skiing is less directed at the screws holding the binding down in it's "footprint" of epoxy. Bedding the base of the binding in epoxy cures any latteral forces from weakening the mount.

          If a skier is ripping out bindings because he bottoms out the springs of his underfoot cable binding, then he needs to take tele lessons or install "T" nuts...
          Last edited by tele.skier; 16 February 2020, 01:16 PM.
          the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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          • #20
            Originally posted by tele.skier View Post
            .....

            Personally, I use glass resin because it sets up rock hard and I can paint the ski's surface under the binding with a light coat, so the force driven through the binding when I'm skiing is less directed at the screws holding the binding down in it's "footprint" of epoxy. Bedding the base of the binding in epoxy cures any latteral forces from weakening the mount.
            You have more confidence in getting the mount position perfect the first time than I; Freeride's 3 positions mitigates, but other bindings??

            And I take it no one's ever heard of melamine and vinyl glue??

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            • #21
              I have tried using gorilla glue to attach my leather straps to the ski but find it does not do as well as good old holes punched in the ski that you thread the leather through.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Baaahb View Post
                I have tried using gorilla glue to attach my leather straps to the ski but find it does not do as well as good old holes punched in the ski that you thread the leather through.
                It’s probably best to burn holes through those wood skis to lace your leather binding to them. Just use a hot poker to burn the holes. No glue needed. It sounds like your gear may match your skill level? Don’t know...just saying.
                Function in disaster, finish in style.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Paul Lutes View Post

                  You have more confidence in getting the mount position perfect the first time than I; Freeride's 3 positions mitigates, but other bindings??

                  And I take it no one's ever heard of melamine and vinyl glue??
                  I usually go boot center on the manufacturer's mark, or maybe a dedicated hardpack ski, I would be +1 forward to get a little more tip pressure for edge oriented skiing.

                  I've seen Roo glue and vinyl glues, but don't have a lot of experience with them. If all you need from a glue is waterproofing around the screw, then any waterproof glue works, and maybe a flexible glue is even better at maintaining a waterproof seal. If you want to enhance the core strength of the ski, then a glue that soaks into the core and cures into a strong solid material is probably better.

                  I use polyester glass resin (and hardener), but you could also use something simpler like titebond III. Just allow for the longer cure time in a warm environment.
                  the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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                  • #24
                    I've always used JBWeld to set my mounts. I originally used this because it was what I had around, but I find it easy to work with. The color makes mixing, coverage, and cleanup easy; it has a good working viscosity, not drippy; the long set time lets you get everything right; it's good to ~-70F.

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                    • #25
                      Well happy New Years everyone. Thought I would fire up another long and heated debate on glue. So my Lynx is holding up fine after using Gorrila Glue on the existing holes to install the shorter cables from 22 designs. Now I have another dilemma for you all.

                      I have a pair of Hypervector BCs. I bought them mounted from Voile with 3 pin Hardwires. This was before the warranty scare on the Hyper series for telemark bindings so I was grandfathered in for warranty.

                      I love the 3 pins and the binding had plenty of power for the Vectors but free pivot is so much easier on my lower back and hip flexors for breaking trail like my Lynx and Axls. So I decided to get a used pair of Switchback X2s for fairly cheap.

                      Should I give the gorilla glue another run for it’s money on this mount? The original holes are in pristine condition after shining flashlight in them and the X2 binding lines up perfect for boot center according to Voile charts.

                      So should I go ahead with using the old holes and fill them with Gorrilla Glue then put some glue on base plate of binding then mount it up? Let it cure for a few days before skiing.

                      I don’t jump of cliffs and ski within my own limits. Nothing too gnarly. Did not have any problems with telemark bindings on my hypervectors so I’m sure they will handle the X2s with no problems.

                      Let the debate begin.

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                      • #26
                        I’ve reused holes plenty of times with gorilla glue. But I’m not sure about doing so with those particular skis.

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                        • #27
                          I agree with jnicol. I've reused holes with Titebond III. If the threads are in good shape and you're careful in reinstalling the binding, I think you should be fine and I wouldn't bother lathering glue on the baseplate - what a mess. I personally suspect Gorilla Glue on the binding or in general adds very little to the overall pullout strength, but I ain't no scientist or enginerd. It's probably a little better at keeping moisture from penetrating the holes than the Titebond III.

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                          • #28
                            Telenerd, aren’t you just pulling the 3-pin Hardwire from the riser block, and bolting on the Switchback X2’s?
                            i think I read on the Voile site the risers are good for 3 mounts. A little Titebond would not hurt.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by fisheater View Post
                              Telenerd, aren’t you just pulling the 3-pin Hardwire from the riser block, and bolting on the Switchback X2’s?
                              i think I read on the Voile site the risers are good for 3 mounts. A little Titebond would not hurt.
                              Nope I plan i taking the hardwire risers plate off since that would be too high off ski with the switback mounted on it just my thoughts. I will see if I can find tight bond. But since
                              Voile, and others say Gorrilla Glue works fine I might just use that since I already have a full bottle. Im waiting on some X2 plugs and heel plates in mail before I mount switchback.

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                              • #30
                                Just a quick update on my Switchback X2 mount on Hypervectors. I ended up using Gorrilla Glue 2 part epoxy and no issues with pull out yet on the existing holes. Did a few tours and hit a few hills. Holding up good. The original holes were prestine and mount feels perfect. The switchback X2 however feels really soft and way slower to engage bellows compared to my Axl or Lynx. But I like a soft binding. It’s a little stiffer than my 3 pin hardwires but not by much.

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