Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do you take with you when you BC ski?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What do you take with you when you BC ski?

    I'm going to try to be well prepared for the BC when the 2014-5 season comes. Obviously, I need skis, skins, poles, bindings and boots. Oh, and a shovel, probe and avi transceiver. But there is a lot more, and I would like to be prepared.

    What's in your backpack (or pockets) when you hit the slopes for ? What have you regretted not having with you, or saw someone else had and thought "great idea"?

  • #2
    Spend the summer reading this blog and going through the archives- http://www.wildsnow.com/
    You will be hard pressed to find a better resource for back country ski touring. That blog and this one of coursehttp://www.earnyourturns.com/

    Of course the usual stuff you bring for back packing, food, water, first aid, repair kit, clean socks, extra gloves, synthetic puffy, headlamp, fire starter, lighter, SOS emergency bivy etc, etc...
    Last edited by airinwrite; 29 March 2014, 11:13 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Half dozen Voile straps. Great for first aid, sled building, ski repair.

      Comment


      • #4
        Zip Ties. Cobbles broken bindings together better than anything.

        Comment


        • #5
          headlamp, Voile straps, compass, GPS (depending where we are going) , extra mitts, extra metal clips for end tail of climbing skins . In the Targa and 7TM binding days, I carried a field repair kit. Small roll of duct tape. Cell phone (if you have coverage) with local Ski Patrol number on speed dial. Small down puff, if I'm not wearing it. Chocolate

          Comment


          • #6
            All of the items listed above should be carried to be a responsible backcountry traveler. If you're in a heavily used and familiar area, you might get away with not packing some of these items...

            The emergency items I find myself using the most are an extra pair of dry mittens after my primary pair have become soaked and useless. And a multi-tool (if you're the only person packing one in a group, this will most likely be used on most tours).
            Tell me where you are skiing and what the conditions are: http://mountainhub.com/
            Ski with me: https://www.meetup.com/Sierra-Club-Hiking-Reno/
            Stalk me: https://www.facebook.com/danomike

            Comment


            • #7
              In addition to what you list, for a day trip: small multitool, minimal repair kit (Voile strap or two, mixable packets for two-part epoxy, 2-3 binding screws, some cord and lamp wire, a pole splint w/ spare basket), headlamp, compass, map, skin wax (glop stopper), duct tape (on my poles), pared-down first aid kit (band-aids, tweezers, Moleskin, antibiotic cream, gauze in some form, first aid tape, lightweight self-sticking ace bandage, aspirin, handi-wipes, small scissors if the multitool doesn't have one), lightweight waterproof hardshell, lightweight puffy, extra gloves, food and water.

              Until you get reasonably good at estimating slope angle, a lightweight slope measuring gadget is helpful for assessing avalanche risk--starting from a nordic background, you will likely find that most of what you want to ski is not steep enough to avalanche except in extraordinary conditions. When I was skiing with kids I did carry a space blanket, but have never come near to needing one and don't do it any more (kids are 25 and 28 now). Also used to carry extra socks in the leather boot days, but have never come near needing those with plastic boots. The need for glop stopper is weather dependent, but the Sierra have a lot of days with temperatures around freezing at some point, so I keep it with me. Used to carry binding parts, but have never experienced, or witnessed first-hand, a binding failure that couldn't be managed long enough to get back to civilization with Voile straps, screws and/or duct tape--I'm crossing my fingers a little on that front. Used to usually carry matches and/or a lighter, but now rarely do--often skiing in areas that wouldn't provide fuel for a fire. Rarely I will take a GPS, for an unfamiliar area with no landmarks and no viewpoints where I can get oriented (typically long spells in trees with complex terrain, no high points or recognizable streams).

              At the margin, what you carry will depend on how much you mind additional weight, season, weather, what you're skiing on a given day and how close to the limit you're going to push yourself that day. I have never come close to being benighted, and Sierra weather, especially in the spring, is pretty predictable, but I hate weight and overtiring myself is a real-life hazard, as opposed to a hypothetical one.

              Comment


              • #8
                fogey,
                That duct tape on the ski poles can dry out over time and be useless for repairs. Replace it often. Ask me how I know

                Comment


                • #9
                  Call me a luddite, I've never used a GPS in my life. Map/compass/altimiter watch and a map are my navigation tools of choice.

                  Here's all my s#!+ laid out. Not going to list every item in the repair and first aid kits. There is a SAM splint next to the snow study kit upper right.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I will add a good snow saw that can double for cutting wood, writing instrument/paper, and some type of vessel to melt snow in (metal cup, etc.).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A ziplock baggie stuffed with dryer lint makes an awesome fire starter and weighs nothing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Brown liquor. Why has no one mentioned brown liquor? What's wrong with you people?
                        backcountry in northern New Mexico

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by televisionary View Post
                          Brown liquor. Why has no one mentioned brown liquor? What's wrong with you people?
                          I thought that's what was meant by fire starter.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Click image for larger version

Name:	ruth-rosaries-fc-boy-rosaries.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	44.6 KB
ID:	81455
                            ..........................

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cesare View Post
                              Call me a luddite, I've never used a GPS in my life. Map/compass/altimiter watch and a map are my navigation tools of choice.

                              Here's all my s#!+ laid out. Not going to list every item in the repair and first aid kits. There is a SAM splint next to the snow study kit upper right.

                              Dang me! An extra pair of skis? You are a true boy scout.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X