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  • light weight tele binding

    Picked up some G3 Soulflys for $125 on STP. As I get older (Medicare this year!), hiking with skis on my pack for long distances in the late spring, early summer is hard on my back. Thought about putting 3pins on the Soulflys to keep the weight down, but I think I'd like a little more binding on those steep, firm, northfacing pitches you find in the summer. What's the best compromise between light weight and active support in a tele binding? Any suggestions appreciated.

  • #2
    http://www.voile.com/voile-telemark-...k-binding.html

    I think the obvious answer is Voile's Switchback X2. It skis very well--not quite as good as a 22Designs binding, but not far off. And it is the lightest and most reliable tour mode binding out there. It's less expensive, easy to mount, made in USA. I have these on all the skis I currently use and have another pair waiting for the next skis. Only binding for me.

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    • #3
      Voile 3pin hardwire...no free pivot, but I like having the pins and the ability to leave the heel throw unlatched for touring/climbing.
      Yay!...(Drool)


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      • #4
        I would also suggest the Switchback. It's light, powerful, simple, and free-pivot. No messing around with heel throws and snow packed in the 3-pin holes, just switch modes and you are good to go!

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        • #5
          I would put pins on them and use a T3/T4/Excursion type boot for late spring and summer skiing. If it's steep and harder just alpine turn.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the quick responses, guys. I really like the X2s, elegant design, but the free pivot bindings are heavy. I should have been clearer: the Soulflys will usually be on the pack, not skinning on the snow. So I'm thinking old, non-free-pivot, as light as possible. I do have some old 3pin hardwires on some old Boundless, and they would work. Any other suggestions?

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            • #7
              I do like the look of the X2s, and the functionality. What I don't like is the price ($300) and the fact that the only thing holding your boot to the binding is the heel throw/cartidge tension...had some bad experiences with that design, such as the boot toe sliding around in the binding. Like the fact that a 3pin holds the boot in. Besides a Voile binding, I can't think of anything else that would meet your needs.
              Yay!...(Drool)


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              • #8
                For me, it would depend on the boots you are using. IMO, I think that more active bindings like AXls/X2's/01's et et need a minimum T2 Eco class boot. On my current BC tele skis I have X2's/Ecos and this a very good system driving a 96 waisted ski. I really like the twin climbing bales too. WTBS, I don't think the weight difference on all the higher end bindings is really big enough to make much difference. It is how the binding works for you with your boots and skis.
                "Just say no to groomed snow"

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                • #9
                  Did you ask about "light weight tele bindings"? ……….. .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JLB View Post
                    Thanks for the quick responses, guys. I really like the X2s, elegant design, but the free pivot bindings are heavy. I should have been clearer: the Soulflys will usually be on the pack, not skinning on the snow. So I'm thinking old, non-free-pivot, as light as possible. I do have some old 3pin hardwires on some old Boundless, and they would work. Any other suggestions?
                    Really if it's just for booting in spring/summer snow 3 pin and light plastic boots are very light and will afford all the control you need on corn and firmer snow. Why not try the toe from your 3 pin HW and see how it works, if it doesn't give enough control use the HWs. I would use HD Mtns or Rotte Super Teles with a wedge mounted direct to the skis I used a set up similar to this for spring skiing a few years back, Heliums, pins and T3s. That setup was super light and was great in corn and firmer snow the only limitation was in deep isothemic mush, I think the Soulfly would handle that much better.

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                    • #11
                      Voile 3-pin Mountaineer is about 450g/pr, Voile 3-pin cable is ~800 g/pr. These are the only lightweight tele bindings these days, where "lightweight" means comparable or equal to the weight of a Dynafit binding (the Speed Radical is 680g per pair, might as well set this as the bar) and where "these days" means actively produced (with some digging, I'm sure you can find a bunch older pin/cable deals or rivas or similar).

                      The Hardwire is 1.3kg/pr. Taking off the wires would bring it near the weight of the Mountaineer. Why wouldn't that work?

                      You mention a "compromise between weight and active support". Well, if you think the Switchbacks are too heavy (1,36 kg/pr or, basically 60g more than the Hardwires), then, no, you can't have nice things.

                      Unless you go to Dynafit, of course. At which point, you'll have lighter bindings, better support, release, reliability and your boots will be lighter and more comfortable. You weren't planning on carrying your boots on your back were you?

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                      • #12
                        To add some numbers to the discussion:

                        Voile 3-pin Mountaineer: 440 grams per pair.
                        Hardwire: 1290 grams per pair.
                        Switchback: 1360 grams per pair.
                        Switchback X2: 1420 grams per pair.

                        In my view, if you'll be skinning at all, the free pivot compensates for the increased weight above the 3-pin binding. If they'll be on your back the whole time, I'd stick with the 3-pins even on steep terrain in spring conditions. If someone added a pivot to a 3-pin binding, it would remove the oxymoron embedded in lightweight tele binding (the TTS binding excepted, but we're not talking about a whole investment in new boots and a new binding).

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                        • #13
                          Similar to airinwrite, I've a pair of Tua Traverses (a bit lighter, narrower), mounted 3-pin, which I ski with leathers. I like to get them out a few times a year. Great fun, you have to really telemark with these, no faking! But at the end of the day, they're basically the same weight as my thoroughly modern Vector/Speed Radical/Scarpa Rush combo.... can't say there isn't a small part of me that's a bit sad about this...

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                          • #14
                            Lite Spikes from Burnt Mountain might be worth considering--1 lb 12 oz (just under 800 g): http://burntmtn.com/00SPIKE3pin/sp3pinindex.html

                            "NEW FOR THIS SEASON, quick attach heel that can be carried in your pack for long approach with 3 pin only and installed for the free pivot climb and steep downhill."

                            I haven't skied these, but like my NT Spikes.

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                            • #15
                              I was going to suggest the same Burntmtn light dogs, as fogey did.
                              http://www.shop.burntmtn.com/Lite-SP...m1plqscsfapp01

                              But like, CSG said, quote
                              "But at the end of the day, they're basically the same weight as my thoroughly modern Vector/Speed Radical/Scarpa Rush combo.... can't say there isn't a small part of me that's a bit sad about this... "
                              My NTN tele boots were cold today, so after noon I jumped on my Volkl Nunataq/Dynafit-Vertical AT setup. Just carrying these 178 cm skis, from my car, I can't believe how light they are! Then the Scarpa Rush AT boots, are warm, comfortable lightweight slippers, but have superb edge control for carving on hard snow. I ducked into some tight Eastern glades, and the combo of light skis, easy swing weight, and superb edge control made me think..Why do I tele with all this heavy gear?

                              So if I had to carry my skis on a pack a lot, or even skin up a lot, and want supreme edge control in no-fall situations, my AT setup would be a no-brainer.

                              The Scarpa Rush are on sale, too.
                              http://www.backcountry.com/scarpa-ru...ring-boot-mens
                              Last edited by chamonix; 5 March 2014, 05:51 PM.

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