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Time to re-bake?

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  • Time to re-bake?

    It's been three (3) seasons and I'm about 30lbs heavier.

    Can't say my feet are actually feeling crowded but as tight as I dare buckle them I'm getting some heel lift.

    The foam must compress underfoot will re-bake "fluff" them up again?
    “Taking away someone’s opinion is no different than sewing a man’s butthole shut.”

  • #2
    yup. I'd re-bake.

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    • #3
      How many days on your liners? If more than 120 or so, get new liners. Otherwise recook.

      Here's what happens in my experience. It isn't the number of times the liner is heated up that determines its life. It is the number of days you pound on it skiing. All liners pack out over time, whether they are moldable or not. A new moldable liner will pack out in 40-50 days. You recook. Then it packs out in 30-40 days. You recook. Now it packs out in 20-30 days and so on. By the time you have pounded on it for 120 days, you can cook it and it will form to your foot but it will pack out in a day. This is why I believe the manufacturers give you a number of 3-5 cooks for a liner. People ask the question and that turns out to be how many times you need to cook it before it's toast. But I don't believe it is the number of times heated up to 160 degrees or however hot the liner actually gets. It's the number of days you ski in it.

      I'm skiing in Intuition liners that have been cooked about 20 times because I use them to train people in bootfitting. They have about 100 days on them and are fitting great. I'll probably retire them after this season but for now they have not packed out yet and I have skied about 30 days since the last cook.

      Intuition liners are good for about 150 days. Others don't last quite as long.
      Last edited by cesare; 2 March 2014, 08:07 AM.

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      • #4
        You have a footbed, right? If not, that could help. Otherwise, what cesare said.
        backcountry in northern New Mexico

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        • #5
          Anybody have some good instructions for a low temp oven re-bake and mold? I have some Garmont Palau liners in need of a fluff up.

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          • #6
            google telemarktips.com cesare's pithy instructions...

            wait... never mind...

            1. Fashion toe caps from old fleece and duct tape.
            2. Remove rack from oven.
            3. Preheat oven to 300 deg F.
            4. Turn oven OFF.
            5. Put cold rack in oven and place liners on rack being careful not to let them touch anything hot.
            6. Close the oven door and set timer for 9 minutes.
            7. Crack open a beer.
            8. Put toecaps on your toes.
            9. Put footbeds inside your socks.
            10. Roll your socks up and pull them over your feet and toecaps with the footbeds inside.
            11. When timer alarm sounds, remove one liner and insert it into the shell if it's not a floppy wrap liner. If floppy wrap liner, put your foot in the liner and with a friend's help put your foot and liner in the shell.
            12. If it is a stiffer tongue liner, put your foot in the liner after it is in the shell.
            13. Lift your heel and pull up on the back of the liner vigorously two times. Repeat steps 11 and 12 with the other liner.
            14. Buckle up your boots just tight enough so the lower buckles stay closed and the cuff buckles make the boot and liner close snugly around your calf.
            15. Stand stock still with your toes on a 2x4 and only slight pressure on the tongues of the boots for 15 minutes. Be sure you have a second beer at hand before you get to this step.
            16. After 15 minutes, remove your boots, take the footbeds out of your socks, and put them in the liners.
            17. Give your feet a chance to recover from tingling and then put your socks back on and try the boots on.
            18. Have a celebratory beer and bong and watch some ski porn. Or you could just GO SKIING!!!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cesare View Post
              How many days on your liners? If more than 120 or so, get new liners. Otherwise recook.

              Here's what happens in my experience. It isn't the number of times the liner is heated up that determines its life. It is the number of days you pound on it skiing. All liners pack out over time, whether they are moldable or not. A new moldable liner will pack out in 40-50 days. You recook. Then it packs out in 30-40 days. You recook. Now it packs out in 20-30 days and so on. By the time you have pounded on it for 120 days, you can cook it and it will form to your foot but it will pack out in a day. This is why I believe the manufacturers give you a number of 3-5 cooks for a liner. People ask the question and that turns out to be how many times you need to cook it before it's toast. But I don't believe it is the number of times heated up to 160 degrees or however hot the liner actually gets. It's the number of days you ski in it.

              I'm skiing in Intuition liners that have been cooked about 20 times because I use them to train people in bootfitting. They have about 100 days on them and are fitting great. I'll probably retire them after this season but for now they have not packed out yet and I have skied about 30 days since the last cook.

              Intuition liners are good for about 150 days. Others don't last quite as long.
              Thanks for that- good info!
              Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

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              • #8
                It's 4:20 somewhere. MS

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                • #9
                  that answers what needs to be done this weekend...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cesare View Post
                    How many days on your liners? If more than 120 or so, get new liners. Otherwise recook.

                    Here's what happens in my experience. It isn't the number of times the liner is heated up that determines its life. It is the number of days you pound on it skiing. All liners pack out over time, whether they are moldable or not. A new moldable liner will pack out in 40-50 days. You recook. Then it packs out in 30-40 days. You recook. Now it packs out in 20-30 days and so on. By the time you have pounded on it for 120 days, you can cook it and it will form to your foot but it will pack out in a day. This is why I believe the manufacturers give you a number of 3-5 cooks for a liner. People ask the question and that turns out to be how many times you need to cook it before it's toast. But I don't believe it is the number of times heated up to 160 degrees or however hot the liner actually gets. It's the number of days you ski in it.

                    I'm skiing in Intuition liners that have been cooked about 20 times because I use them to train people in bootfitting. They have about 100 days on them and are fitting great. I'll probably retire them after this season but for now they have not packed out yet and I have skied about 30 days since the last cook.

                    Intuition liners are good for about 150 days. Others don't last quite as long.
                    Thanks cesare, that's very helpful.

                    To edit my op, yeah probably no more than 120 days on them, the OEM liners in my Synergys over the course of three seasons.
                    What I meant is that they sat idle for three seasons while I got fat and maybe my feet flattened out a bit............uh.
                    “Taking away someone’s opinion is no different than sewing a man’s butthole shut.”

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