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Paraffin in place of Glop Stopper?

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  • Paraffin in place of Glop Stopper?

    Anybody?

    Don't have access to glob stopper, but I do have a block of paraffin wax. Pure mohairs.

  • #2
    Closest I have come is glide wax which seemed to work pretty well.

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    • #3
      Let's be clear here. Are you trying to stop globs, or glops? The difference is important. Globs require globstopper. Glops only need a bit of wax - glide wax works good enough for glops, but not globs.

      ain't no turn like tele!

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      • #4
        I've used a candle, regular ski (glide) wax and a bar of paraffin wax when I didn't have any Glop Stopper wax handy. They all seemed to work OK.

        Incidentally, the weather sure has been weird around here this year. Last week at Hilda Hut we had an inversion set in and it was the first time ever that I recall having to use Glop Stopper wax in January. :-(

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Dostie View Post
          Let's be clear here. Are you trying to stop globs, or glops? The difference is important. Globs require globstopper. Glops only need a bit of wax - glide wax works good enough for glops, but not globs.
          I hope that's you using that "sarcasm" thing that's SO hard to discern on the innertronz.

          I'm shooting for general waterproofness in what NoPin is accurately describing as the world's weirdest winter. I might be over preparing as my real concern is whether I have the fitness to climb 3k ft. or will remember how to ski back down.

          Chezzerae's comment on another thread has me thinking that the way to go might be to go ahead and iron it in before I leave. I don't want to iron paraffin wax into mohair if it doesn't work. My gut feeling is that it will. Mainly checking to make sure no one had some awful experience. I don't see any "NOOOOOO...." posts.

          edited to add: I found a can of some swix product a ski buddy generously gave me to try out and that I never used - that may be a safer bet.
          Last edited by Matt J; 28 January 2014, 07:41 PM.

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          • #6
            Ski wax composition seems to be a pretty esoteric subject. Does anyone know what the difference is between plain paraffin and all purpose, universal glide wax? This latter is the stuff I've always used since our coastal snow always has a wide range of temperatures, and it works. Recently bought from Tognar 2.6 pounds of Toko bulk, all purpose, universal wax for $40 + shipping, and it came in bars without any logo or other identifier molded in. It occurs to me it may not be substantially different than the 10 lb. blocks of wax you can buy at craft stores, at selected melting points/hardnesses, and for about $25. Has anyone tried any form of non-ski wax paraffin for skis or skins? Clearly just an academic question as I am set for wax for a long time.

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            • #7
              My understanding is that paraffin is fine for spring conditions, but gets slower as snow gets colder and doesn't last very long. Additives of other harder waxes like stearic acid, paraflint, vybar, microcrystalline, shellac flakes, and pine tar are often recommended to improve the performance. I've also seen mention of detergents, hardeners, and lubricants like graphite, teflon, and molybdenum.

              I hot wax with paraffin at the beginning of each season to clean the bases and use it as storage wax. In a bind it works, but needs to be reapplied much more frequently. I think using cheap wax and waxing more often is better than not waxing. If you look around the ski racks at lunch most skis have nearly zero wax on their bases. A lot of rental programs don't even pretend they wax skis.
              Last edited by Matt J; 28 January 2014, 08:46 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Matt J View Post

                Chezzerae's comment on another thread has me thinking that the way to go might be to go ahead and iron it in before I leave. I don't want to iron paraffin wax into mohair if it doesn't work. My gut feeling is that it will. Mainly checking to make sure no one had some awful experience. I don't see any "NOOOOOO...." posts.
                No, I would not melt any wax into my skins. Unless, one wanted a reason to buy a new pair.

                "There's a whole lot of reward on the other side of risk."

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                • #9
                  Would you like to explain why you think ironing the wax into the plush for a second and a half would destroy your skins?

                  I mean this is not in the category of taking your skins to the dry cleaner.

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                  • #10
                    I mix paraffin with true ski wax on my bases as a matter of course to get more applications out of the more expensive ski wax bars. I tend to buy cold snow wax and mix less paraffin in the colder the snow actually is. Paraffin sucks on really cold snow.

                    I also frequently rub paraffin on skin plush. Most times it is helpful to prevent sticking snow and to reduce water saturation. There have been a few rare occasions when the paraffin attracted unconsolidated snow, however. If the weather is warm enough, paraffin on skins will function fine. It could get grabby with cold pow though.

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                    • #11
                      A little thread drift here but B_, could you explain how you mix the waxes? I assume you melt them, mix, and let harden but more details and recommeded "safety precautions" would be appreciated. By me at least..............

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by telorti View Post
                        A little thread drift here but B_, could you explain how you mix the waxes? I assume you melt them, mix, and let harden but more details and recommeded "safety precautions" would be appreciated. By me at least..............
                        Sometimes I mix two different types of glide wax during hot waxing and I just dribble some of each onto the ski and then assume the iron mixes them while they're liquid. I think this is what B is referring to. Melting some paraffin onto the ski with the glide wax would insure coverage and get some of the benefits of the additives of the glide wax while conserving it.

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                        • #13
                          Me thinks the bigger issue here is not so much mixing waxes as determining whether warm/soft snow waxes work better than cold/hard snow waxes. This thread could be a good place to get feedback on what works best in what conditions. IOW - do you wax your skins the same way you would a ski base - based on temperature, or is there a difference in the wax for glide and longevity. After working in a shop that makes a huge deal about waxing skis (for racing) it seems that soft waxes will adhere better and thus prevent icing/glopping of the skins, but they would also rub off easier. Hard/cold snow waxes probably last longer, but to be effective, might need the ironing trick to help them adhere to the fibers better.

                          So, if you do use a regular glide wax to wax your skins, what's your preference and experience?

                          Mine? I use whatever small chunk of wax is left around from a larger bar of wax. Typically it is a universal, or soft/warm snow wax. I have never ironed it in, only rubbed it on at the trailhead. It is typically worn off after 1000 vert, but that is usually the critical zone where the skins show signs of icing, or not.

                          ain't no turn like tele!

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                          • #14
                            Indeed I just drip both paraffin and cold wax onto the ski base and then mix through the ironing process. Cold wax may be harder to find but it is typically not significantly more expensive than universal. Conditions are usually relatively warm in the Sierras Nevadas so it is economical to use a cold wax & paraffin mix. For our warm conditions using a colder ski wax allows for a higher percentage of (inexpensive) paraffin to be mixed in, at least that is my thinking.

                            Getting back to the topic of skin waxing, I too typically have just rubbed on the paraffin. I use the purple BD skin wax if I happen to have it , but I always keep a chunk of paraffin in my pack. I have never personally experienced snow attraction issues true skin wax. I have noticed it a limited number of times with paraffin, but those instances have been isolated.

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                            • #15
                              Ive been hot waxing my skins for years with no problems but I think I have a pretty safe method in doing so. First add a layer of parchment paper between the skin and ski base when I hot wax. This would prevent any glue transfer from skin to ski base. I always use warm ski wax to my skins. I rub the wax into the skins, the warm wax applies easially and thickly. Once this is done, I run a wax iron over the skin. One pass pretty quick does the trick. I then fold up the skins with the parchment paper still attached and throw into the freezer. Don't really have a reason for this but the skins come out of the freezer nice and stiff and ready for use.

                              Now, as far as performance, I think the waxed skins actually glide slower unless the snow is moist. I don't care as usually I am slogging along in deep snow where there isn't much glide anyway. One huge plus for me is that the waxed skins are grippier on slick frozen skin tracks. At Tahoe, with the dawn patrollers and general BC traffic, the skin tracks are usually set and they are usually steep. It is a real advantage climbing a steep track with extra bite. The extra bite is noticable.

                              Additionally, I have used waterproofing spray on my skins with OK results. This works best in warm Spring snow that is wet but gloppy and sticky in the shade.
                              "Just say no to groomed snow"

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