Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Steripen troubleshooting needed

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Steripen troubleshooting needed

    Couldn't find an answer to this elsewhere . . .

    So my Steripen worked great for 4 days for 2 people, then on the 5th day when I turned it on the flashlight/sensor thingy flashes, and the main UV light works for about 15 seconds then shuts off and the indicator light flashes red. Any idea what's going on?
    Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

  • #2
    Not sure what that means but their web site has a useful page on what all the lights signal.

    Comment


    • #3
      I had the same issue with mine but was not able to resolve it. Very frustrating. Returned it... so I guess that isn't much help to you.
      Does yours have the older electric sensor to test that it is submerged? or the newer light sensor? Mine was the older and I had a strong hunch it was the sensor that was the problem.

      Either way I really hope they improve the design of these down the line. It is a great idea, but I think the implementation leaves a bit to be desired.

      Comment


      • #4
        Actually I think it's just a low battery, sorry for bothering you all. For some reason I thought it did a thousand liters per set of batteries or something but it turns out it just 50- it's the lamp that last for thousands of hours
        Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by whitehonky
          In the vane of where "upslope" was going on this... has anyone truly had good luck with these over the long haul (too new still?). What is wrong with the pump filter/purification tablet combo? It's so simple and pretty much idiot proof in the field. To me, the steripen only replaces the purification tablet, as you still want to filter for water quality/clarity/taste and the tablet is miniscule in size and weight and is low-tech and newer tablets only have a very very minor chlorine taste. So why the steripen hassle?

          Even my kids can fool-proofedly pump a litre of water and purify it. Maybe I'm missing some key revelation with the steripen???
          I carry purification tablets in my backpacking kit... but never use it after filtering. Seems like overkill.

          I got this filter recently and it's light and handy. Threads are a bit wimpy, though, apparently...

          https://www.google.com/search?q=sawy...w=1600&bih=815

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by whitehonky
            In the vane of where "upslope" was going on this... has anyone truly had good luck with these over the long haul (too new still?). What is wrong with the pump filter/purification tablet combo? It's so simple and pretty much idiot proof in the field. To me, the steripen only replaces the purification tablet, as you still want to filter for water quality/clarity/taste and the tablet is miniscule in size and weight and is low-tech and newer tablets only have a very very minor chlorine taste. So why the steripen hassle?

            Even my kids can fool-proofedly pump a litre of water and purify it. Maybe I'm missing some key revelation with the steripen???
            For me it is all about reducing bulk. Anything I can do to reduce the volume of gear in my pack makes me happy. Filters, at least the ones I've used, are bulky. The steripen is certainly compact and light. Sadly it was nothing but trouble for me. As for filtering.... it is interesting, over the past 8 or so years I've only used various drops (aqua mira), tablets (iodine, aqua mira), and the steripen. I've had good luck I guess in finding water sources that didn't really need much filtering for general nastiness (mostly CA and UT).

            I also just picked up the sawyer squeeze system... but won't really field test that for a few weeks.

            It seems like someone could make a bottle with an integrated UV system... picture a nalgene with a UV bulb in the base.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by whitehonky
              And tablets are considerably less bulk that a steripen, which is why I question this, other than the taste factor....
              [/img]
              So I guess the other postive factor for the Steripen over tablets/drops is the appeal of being chemical free.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by whitehonky
                Tablets are for viruses and bugs. Filters are for water clarity, suspended contaminants, oils, and other impurities (I'm generalising).... so if you're out there not wanting to get sick, and know you're going to have clear flowing water, I'd take tablets (or steripen) over a filter.
                I'm not sure that that's entirely accurate, or at least filters claim to have small enough pores to block giardia cysts and other bugs. I believe you're right that chemicals or Steripen and similar devices are needed for viruses.

                Incidentally, I've had giardia and another parasite (dientamoeba fragilis) at different times. They both suck, as do the pills you have to take to kill them.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I looked at the Steripen for a bit. But it needs a filter for non-flowing water which reduces the convenience factor somewhat.
                  When I was looking at steripens I recall there being some info about the lights and such in the reviews of the product on REIs website. Might check there.
                  I use tablets almost exclusively when I treat water. My filter hasn't worked in years and it weighs a ton. Pumping water sucks. I can treat 5L at once with tablets which would take an ungodly amount of time of back breaking waterside hunching over to produce with a pump.

                  Many will gasp at this concept.... but I've taken to drinking directly out of flowing streams in the Sierra if I'm what I determine to be in a reasonable location.
                  I've had giardia before and it wasn't the end of the world, although it did suck. Actually it more blew than than anything

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bergbryce View Post
                    Many will gasp at this concept.... but I've taken to drinking directly out of flowing streams in the Sierra if I'm what I determine to be in a reasonable location.
                    Someone once took the time to study that question and concluded that the risk of slurping down a parasite is very, very, very low (in N. America, at least that's where the study occurred). So, it's just another matter of crunching your own risk-inconvenience equation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by whitehonky
                      I don't know... I'd always rather err on purification over filtering. Even a small bout with Giardia is enough to validate dropping a tablet into a bottle. Tablets are for viruses and bugs. Filters are for water clarity, suspended contaminants, oils, and other impurities (I'm generalising)....
                      Every filter I know of filters everything short of viruses. And from what I understand, viruses are a virtual non-issue unless traveling abroad. I can understand erring on the side of caution, though...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by upslope View Post
                        It seems like someone could make a bottle with an integrated UV system... picture a nalgene with a UV bulb in the base.
                        Camelbak does.
                        It's turns! Of course it's worth the hike!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jfb View Post
                          well then. Thanks for pointing that out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I can predict my water sources will be sediment free, I carry the Steripen. Less bulk as others have mentioned. Have had good luck with it, even using it in Africa. When I think the water is going to be carrying sediment. I skip the pen and bring the filter.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Steripen has always done a great job for me- I was just being stupid about the battery thing. It only takes a minute for a liter of water, so much faster than a filter, in addition to being lighter & smaller. But as others have said, filters (if a decent one) take care of bacteria, and viruses are only an issue for overseas travel as I understand it.

                              I should add- there was an article floating around a few years ago where someone tested a bunch of wild mountain sources and found that giardia was relatively rare. Having gotten infected with it once in Nepal I wouldn't forgo filtering/treating water generally, but I don't freak out about it if I end up drinking some untreated water because of filter or treatment failure (we all do a little when we swim anyway).
                              Reluctant enthusiast, part-time crusader, half-hearted fanatic

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X