Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Revising my touring setup/s

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Revising my touring setup/s

    Good morning,
    Just looking for input on revising my touring setup. I’m currently using some Salomon Q105s with G3 bindings and Atomic Backland boots. The Salomons were my first-ever skis for BC touring and now, five seasons in, I’m looking for an update because they’re literally coming apart.
    This will be a bc setup, I've already got a pair of Volkl 90eights with Marker Baron bindings for the resort.
    Anyway, I’m not a great skier but getting better and most of my skiing is on Tamarack, Incline Peak and some Carson Pass. I’m 6’2 and 210+ weight.
    I think my Atomic Backland boots and the G3 bindings would pair nicely with some Voile Vector skis w fishscales for longer days on spring snow. But I’d still need a good boot/ski/binding combo for winter tours that are shorter and more focused on the downhill.
    Guy at The Backcountry in Truckee is pushing some Scotts. I’m also seeing some nice Volkls and K2s out there. As for boots, I like the buckles and ski/walk mechanism on the Dynafits.
    Anyway, happy to get input on good setup for winter BC tours mostly in and around Tahoe Basin, Carson, Lassen, Shasta and interior Nevada. Thanks!
    Last edited by Dostie; 18 March 2019, 07:00 PM.

  • #2
    Guy at The Backcountry in Truckee is pushing some Scotts
    What Scott ski? I have done some skinning up at the resort (before lifts ran) on a pair of Scott SG 105 skis, and I really like them. With a relatively burly Maestrale RS boot, and ION LT bindings, I have also skied this setup at the resort, a day last week, and they have been fun. For such a light ski, they hold on firmer snow (and some ice) really well. So a good 50/50 setup for touring and occasional resort day. They may be a bit wide for long days of skinning in deep snow, but I have my Wailer 99s for that.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SG 105 on bench.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	1.30 MB
ID:	88861
    Last edited by chamonix; 20 January 2019, 05:58 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ben S.

      Without referencing any specific models I can say from years of skiing the Sierra, Tahoe, Shasta, Lassen, and the San Gabriels, don't go too light on the skis. You need some muscle in your skis to kick back at the heavy snow. Make sure they're damp, not just light for their width. And for boots, well just about anything a bit beefier than the Backland should be sufficient, as long as it fits well.

      ain't no turn like tele!

      Comment


      • #4
        What Dostie said^^^. For a guy your size and Tahoe I would look at 110-115 underfoot, Pin Tech bindings and boots in the 6-7# category. I am your size and that is my primary kit for most of the time. I also have the same kit with 96 UF for lesser days and Spring. Biggest issue is the right boot. Fit # one of course. For 100% BC I really like Voile and a Voile V8 in 181 would be a choice. I think you could throw together a kit sub 18# pretty easy. You can also save weigh with light skins. I love Pomoca Race skins, we have three pair and way better on all accounts over BD. Glide better too IMO
        "Just say no to groomed snow"

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the input. Went with the K2 Wayback 106. Still have the Backland boots from Alpenglow four years ago ... but might get something a little burlier if I don’t think the Backlands are doing the job. Dynas or Scarpas, maybe? Transferring the G3 bindings, also from Alpenglow, to the K2s.
          Still considering a lighter setup for the long tours of spring, maybe Voile Vectors w fishscales for long days on rolling terrain.

          Comment


          • #6
            Do you have any light fishscale setup? I think you will find that a very useful set up to have for longer tours, including in spring, with a freeheel boot/binding. It may take some time to learn but it is the best for touring and around Tahoe we have a lot of days when the conditions are not so great for chasing turns due to heavy snow/dust on crust/just plain old crust, but still lots of fun for touring and gentle turns. And, in spring when conditions rock, corn is one of the easiest conditions to ski so you can get down even with flimsier gear. IMO you don't need to go very wide..about 100.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Baaahb View Post
              Do you have any light fishscale setup? I think you will find that a very useful set up to have for longer tours, including in spring, with a freeheel boot/binding. It may take some time to learn but it is the best for touring and around Tahoe we have a lot of days when the conditions are not so great for chasing turns due to heavy snow/dust on crust/just plain old crust, but still lots of fun for touring and gentle turns. And, in spring when conditions rock, corn is one of the easiest conditions to ski so you can get down even with flimsier gear. IMO you don't need to go very wide..about 100.
              Not yet ... was thinking fishscale with my Backland boots and Fritschi bindings that you can lock and free heel without removing ski.

              Comment


              • #8
                Although my skiing has been primarily with tele gear, I have dabbled with AT including the Fritschi Daimir Vipec newer versions and really like them. I think they get a bad rap because the first year version had issues but the latest ones are pretty cool and my experience with them has been good. And like you say, one touch with your pole and you go from ski to tour mode, nice feature. Plus they are light, although some folks worry about durability because of so much plastic. TUV Din rated release. What’s not to like about that? I’ve thought about a similar setup that you mention, plus 1 here.
                Last edited by SPQR; 21 January 2019, 12:17 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the touring I'm thinking of you need a lighter boot and a tele binding which allows you to do an efficient kick and glide motion, allowing you to travel six mph or so across the flats and through the woods -- not that you need to go that fast but that's the sort of gear and efficiency you want....some of course can go much faster and farther especially with very light gear. It's more like running or jogging than skinning...and easier than jogging. You simply cannot get that efficient motion with a big boot or with a free pivot. The two buckle Garmont Excursion type boots work well for this if you don't want to go full leather. Of course there are advantages to going lighter with the gear of which you speak, which will give you better support on the downhill, but it's just a lighter way of doing what you're already doing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Baaahb View Post
                    For the touring I'm thinking of you need a lighter boot and a tele binding which allows you to do an efficient kick and glide motion, allowing you to travel six mph or so across the flats and through the woods -- not that you need to go that fast but that's the sort of gear and efficiency you want....some of course can go much faster and farther especially with very light gear. It's more like running or jogging than skinning...and easier than jogging. You simply cannot get that efficient motion with a big boot or with a free pivot. The two buckle Garmont Excursion type boots work well for this if you don't want to go full leather. Of course there are advantages to going lighter with the gear of which you speak, which will give you better support on the downhill, but it's just a lighter way of doing what you're already doing.
                    Good input and I don’t doubt the veracity. But I have yet to learn how to tele so my choices are limited to AT options.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Ben, IMO, good choice on what you are going to do. You are use to your boots, Ions are great and reliable and the new skis are going to be big and light. I bet weight will be under 17# and way lighter than the lumber most guys are using around here. As far as Baaahb's point and hacking around on the flats, sure but you don't need tele gear, just use what you have and or add some AT fishscales like I did. Anyway, where we live, warming climate means higher snow levels and not much low angle slopes to cruise on. So, steeper slopes and more down orientated.........
                      "Just say no to groomed snow"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Skied the K2s with the Backland boots and G3 bindings for first time today. Holy pow, they were fantastic. So light!!!! But they edge and maintain in bumpy snow. Wowza.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X