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  • Pedal hop turn

    Nice blast from the past, Craig. I remember when you first published Bela's article.

    My modern, 2-footed variation, which I have actually used for decades, is characterized by less independent leg action, lack of divergence, and of course, no double poling.

    1. Start from a stationary position with your skis at 90 degree angle to the fall line.
    2. Reach as far down the slope as you can to plant your pole, flexing both knees and ankles in preparation for the initiation.
    3. Rise up as your pole touches the snow lifting your downhill ski first as if you are driving to the hoop for a layup in basketball.
    4. As you push away from the slope with your uphill foot, keep your knees flexed and let the energy you have stored in your core due to the opposition of your upper body and skis rotate your momentarily airborne skis into the fall line. You don't have to jump hard at all to get this to happen.
    Let your skis touch gently down pointing straight down the fall line.
    5. At this point it is very easy to edge and steer both skis to finish the turn so you come to a stop facing the opposite direction.
    6. Repeat.

    Maintain mostly equal weight on your skis and only hop and lift your feet high enough to get them out of the snow and clear the slope. Don't over-rotate. Keep your upper body facing straight down the fall line.

  • #2
    Bela, as in Bela and Mimi of ASI?

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    • #3
      Good description. I have always kind of messed this up by not bringing the uphill leg around quick enough. The video helped quite a bit. I get to divergent for to long.
      Last edited by James; 25 November 2013, 10:32 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cesare View Post
        Nice blast from the past, Craig. I remember when you first published Bela's article.

        My modern, 2-footed variation, which I have actually used for decades, is characterized by less independent leg action, lack of divergence, and of course, no double poling.
        At the time (circa 1994) YouTube videos and GoPro helmet cams were just a dream, so Bela and I worked hard to over-emphasize the movements necessary to better communicate what was going on. His demonstration was from a standing position, for the crux "first turn" on a steep descent. As the Vallencant video makes more clear, it is best done as a dynamic move which requires MUCH less energy and equally less exaggeration of movement to achieve the desired results. The double-pole is nice for getting it going, but notice in the last image he is leaning down on only one pole to initiate the next turn.

        NB - yes, Bela Vadasz of Bela & Mimi Vadasz's Alpine Skills International.

        ain't no turn like tele!

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        • #5
          Bela and Mimi are nice people, I did a bunch of rehab on the Cal Trans building they used for their school. They paid me in cash and credit, the credit I used to get climbing lessons with John Hoffman and tele lessons with ASI.

          Didn't ASI moved to Bishop?? I suppose this was to get away from the crowds and closer to the alpine climbing down South, though it's kinda sad cuz that was a great location and neat hostel.

          As to pedal turns, I learned those from reading some ski mag back in the eighties, they called it a bicycle turn, definitely worth having in the tool box for making quick transitions and for getting out of tight spots with a little more power.

          So where's the link to this video??
          Last edited by Nurse Ben; 25 November 2013, 11:49 AM.

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          • #6
            NB,

            ASI did not move to Bishop. They did sell the Donner Spitz Hutte to Sugar Bowl where it now houses the students attending the Sugar Bowl Academy. Quite the dreamy location for budding ski Olympians.

            ASI now operates out of Sugar Bowl in the winter for hosting their Intro to BC courses, and out of The Back Country retail shop in Truckee for summer climbing and basic office operations.

            ain't no turn like tele!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Nurse Ben View Post
              So where's the link to this video??
              It is in the article on the cover page or
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2soYD8LX7YI

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              • #8
                compared to how the euros are doing it today, the video and photos in the article are much more exagerated
                e.g.s:
                remy (RIP): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E2wBno6kpU

                and baud (@ ~1:44) : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU574FH9nlg

                watching the baud vid, he only pedal hops some of his turns on the steep descent.

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                • #9
                  Okay, I found the article, my browser was not showing me the header.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cesare View Post
                    Nice blast from the past, Craig. I remember when you first published Bela's article.

                    My modern, 2-footed variation, which I have actually used for decades, is characterized by less independent leg action, lack of divergence, and of course, no double poling.

                    1. Start from a stationary position with your skis at 90 degree angle to the fall line.
                    2. Reach as far down the slope as you can to plant your pole, flexing both knees and ankles in preparation for the initiation.
                    3. Rise up as your pole touches the snow lifting your downhill ski first as if you are driving to the hoop for a layup in basketball.
                    4. As you push away from the slope with your uphill foot, keep your knees flexed and let the energy you have stored in your core due to the opposition of your upper body and skis rotate your momentarily airborne skis into the fall line. You don't have to jump hard at all to get this to happen.
                    Let your skis touch gently down pointing straight down the fall line.
                    5. At this point it is very easy to edge and steer both skis to finish the turn so you come to a stop facing the opposite direction.
                    6. Repeat.

                    Maintain mostly equal weight on your skis and only hop and lift your feet high enough to get them out of the snow and clear the slope. Don't over-rotate. Keep your upper body facing straight down the fall line.
                    And then there's the alternative..Which I prefer
                    Geeze, Kingdom Tele Boys poles ! Can you imagine getting
                    wrapped up in them ? BTW, do you lengthen your poles a bit
                    for the PH turn or no ?
                    Last edited by Vtfreeski; 28 November 2013, 09:24 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Nope

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                      • #12
                        I have always liked this ^^^pic and more then once I have thought about it when I was on a sketchy for me slope. I am certainly no expert in this but think the commitment to moving your core down hill and pressuring that pole is key. The picture is a good illustration of that, thanks.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks James. But don't you think those pants make my ass look fat? Oh wait... some people just say my ass is fat.

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                          • #14
                            Still have a ways to go in learning the pedal-hop turn, much like my basketball dribbling. Only time it works for me is when it has to.

                            Here, my skis are heading the opposite way of the pole plant, the pole grip is all backa--wards. the head is down, etc…… soon to result in a face slap by the snowpack. (Picture not included.)
                            Click image for larger version

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                            • #15
                              Biggest problem I see Matt is your left hand is behind your hip. Might as well double pole.

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