Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Eastern skiing and bacon grilled cheese sandwich thread..

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nope, just from Hojo's. Little Headwall was looking good, no water showing in the view from where the Rangers stand to monitor the traffic. Folks were skiing all over that and Lower Snowfield. Duchess was extra PHAT! Empress looked doable. There is a lot of snow!
    Go for adventure, take pix, but make certain to bring'em back alive!

    Comment


    • Originally posted by RobRoyMeans View Post
      ...no water showing in the view from where the Rangers stand to monitor the traffic.
      Water or not, the department should at least get those rangers a chair.



      Comment


      • Looked good from the road.
        Click image for larger version

Name:	20190414_062749.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	2.10 MB
ID:	95501

        Comment


        • But the bottom was gone.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	20190414_062856.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	5.66 MB
ID:	95503

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Todd Eastman View Post
            Avi Fatality on Mt. Washington 3/11/19
            From reading the article I see that the rating that day was "moderate". From further reading of that article, I pasted a quote from it below:

            According to observer Kurt Niiler, there were at least three human-triggered avalanches on a different part of the mountain. The first involved a skier, who was not caught up in it or hurt, near the base of Halfpipe Gully. The second one was apparently triggered by a party of three people near Double Barrell, with one of them potentially getting caught for a short time. No one there was hurt. The third, which involved a snowboarder who was not hurt, was triggered near the Airplane Bowl.
            It seems that there were some serious issues with the snowpack that would justify more than a moderate rating. "Considerable" is probably more accurate. Given the fatal accident and the 3 other skier triggered incidents on the same day, I'd say the local avy center's forcast was not accurate for that day for that aspect and elevation. When you see this much activity in an area, You should go ski low angle slopes. You can't out-think or out-manuver snowpack instability, even though some do it and get away with it temporarily.

            Experienced, knowledgable backcountry skiers get caught in avalanches often enough. Sometimes they are caught because of an isolated localized condition and observed so much stability everywhere, that they made a decision that it's "All good everywhere". (I have done this and never got caught so far) Sometimes they think they've figured it out and ski without incident and what really happened is they made a poor decision, but got lucky. If you make a poor decision, as in skiing steep slopes in that area on a day when 4 skiers triggered 4 different avalanches,..... Own your poor decision, and thank your lucky stars... If you keep that up, it may catch up to you.

            This $hit is serious business in my area out west. If you ski the backcountry, or even a lot of sidecountry, learn about avalanche science and track your local area's seasonal snowpack on a daily/weekly/monthly basis. I realize back east is less avalanche prone. The elevations are different, the forestation is different, the mountains are different, but that's no excuse not to be cautious and really learn and track your snowpack.

            The 11th of this month marked the 2 year aniversary of the loss of my good friend to an avalanche on a moderate day. I'm pretty passionate about avalanche science since then, so if I seem like a zealot, or more of a nutcase than usual, you know my reason.

            On a less serious note, I'm glad you guys back east had a great season. I've enjoyed your pictures and stories.
            the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

            Comment


            • Originally posted by JohnF View Post
              Looked good from the road.
              A wise man once said, "You won't know if you don't go".

              Comment


              • This is why nobody likes that man.

                Originally posted by JohnF View Post
                But the bottom was gone.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	20190414_062856.jpg Views:	33 Size:	5.66 MB ID:	95503
                That being said, still looks like some good turns lookers left.
                Last edited by aqua toque; 15th April 2019, 07:17 PM.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by tele.skier View Post



                  This $hit is serious business in my area out west. If you ski the backcountry, or even a lot of sidecountry, learn about avalanche science and track your local area's seasonal snowpack on a daily/weekly/monthly basis. I realize back east is less avalanche prone. The elevations are different, the forestation is different, the mountains are different, but that's no excuse not to be cautious and really learn and track your snowpack.
                  The skier who died was wearing a beacon, but wasn't skiing with a partner. So getting buried, even with a beacon wasn't going to help him much. He probably carried the beacon/ shovel/ probe, in case someone else he saw was buried.
                  Why I usually ski backcountry with a partner. Certainly anything above tree line back East. Too easy to injure an ankle, break a binding, or even break a leg skiing in the New England hardwoods.
                  Two years ago I was skiing with a friend who buried a ski in rotten spring snow after skiing over a small rise. I helped him dig out his ski/boot, but he had a bad ankle sprain. He was able to ski out, but it could have been a broken ankle.
                  Last edited by chamonix; 16th April 2019, 03:33 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by aqua toque View Post
                    ...
                    That being said, still looks like some good turns lookers left.
                    I was considering it. But snow was sliding down from time to time. Lot of water between the snow and the smooth rock bed. Kind of spooked me.

                    Comment


                    • Graham Link partly trimmed back. Between GOSST and 3700' the shell-pant rippers, face-whacks and the back-of-neck snow-dumpers have been removed. That's about 1/4 of the GL length. The blown in snow was delightful on the way back down. The crusty highspots were, umm, "edgeable".
                      Go for adventure, take pix, but make certain to bring'em back alive!

                      Comment


                      • I took a visiting splitboarder into some secret glades (unnamed) at Jay Peak and he was very happy. Tight trees, but untracked with about 4-6 inches creamy snow, on a firm base. We had first tracks. With more time (or if I was skiing with skins) we could have done Big Jay. He had skins for his splitboard in his pack.

                        I might have a picture..
                        Click image for larger version  Name:	Resized_20190417_110713.jpeg Views:	2 Size:	956.1 KB ID:	95536
                        This wasn't where we skied, but is representative of snow conditions. Anything in the bright sun got soft by noon.
                        Last edited by chamonix; 17th April 2019, 05:07 PM.

                        Comment


                        • Viewing that in full res with bright sun gives a good sense of the snow.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by tele.skier View Post
                            It seems that there were some serious issues with the snowpack that would justify more than a moderate rating. "Considerable" is probably more accurate. Given the fatal accident and the 3 other skier triggered incidents on the same day, I'd say the local avy center's forcast was not accurate for that day for that aspect and elevation. When you see this much activity in an area, You should go ski low angle slopes. You can't out-think or out-manuver snowpack instability, even though some do it and get away with it temporarily.
                            We're talking tree anchors that are there in 14 of 15 seasons not being there, plus a strong get-on-it factor that increases the number of parties. The first one might not have been taken enough into account. Every slope outside typical paths was prone to go bigger than it almost ever will.

                            Comment


                            • Could be last days at Jay Peak. I was on the Tram, when it stopped today for 15 minutes. Then it ran very slowly to the top. A normally 8 minute ride, took 28 minutes. So Tram could be shut down with mechanical problems.
                              After this weekend, they may just run the Jet chair. Good spring snow, many runs off the Jet with 100% coverage, but if you try to take shortcuts, expect some of this..I had to walk over some grass, to reach a ski run.
                              Click image for larger version  Name:	Resized_20190423_105905.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	960.1 KB ID:	95593
                              Last edited by chamonix; Yesterday, 11:26 AM.

                              Comment


                              • Skiing is soooo 2 weeks ago

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X