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Decisions, decisions.....what binding?

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  • Decisions, decisions.....what binding?

    For 170 Voile Vector BC's ridden by a flailing intermediate wearing Synergys on his feet in the PNW concrete.
    Last year when I looked them over I figured they'd get Switchback 2's.
    This year I actually bought them.........how's about the Burnt Mtn. Spike Blade?
    Any other light weight candidates I should be thinking about other than the 3-pin hrdwr's out in the garage?
    Last edited by twopass; 20 November 2013, 12:45 AM. Reason: Quadzilla......
    “Taking away someone’s opinion is no different than sewing a man’s butthole shut.”

  • #2
    Duckbills forever? Switchback forever!!
    An Italian dweller of the Low Countries, who tries hard to ski the world in spite of his present location.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by twopass View Post
      For 170 Voile Vector BC's ridden by a flailing intermediate in the PNW.
      Last year when I looked them over I figured they'd get Switchback 2's.
      This year I actually bought them.........how's about the Burnt Mtn. Spike Blade?
      Any other light weight candidates I should be thinking about other than the 3-pin hrdwr's out in the garage?
      What kind of boots are you going to use? I use T2 Ecos and X2's, a great setup for this ski, my wife uses T2 Eco's and SB's. Works good for her too. I like what I have, a little extra power as compared to a SB but still soft enough to slog around with the binding locked up.
      "Just say no to groomed snow"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by KLW
        I just skied my BC125's with an older gen Bulldog on it yesterday for the first time. The step in convenience is gonna make it hard for me to ever tour with my 01's again Even though the snow was crap and the turns limited I was impressed with the bulldog. It handled my 125's so well that I'm thinking about trying it out on my powder skis.
        Are those the ones w/pins? Do those have the under foot heel throw?
        I ask because the Vectors gonna' end up doing double duty as resort boards.

        Like.....
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        Last edited by twopass; 20 November 2013, 01:53 PM.
        “Taking away someone’s opinion is no different than sewing a man’s butthole shut.”

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        • #5
          I think the Switchback and Switchback X-2 are by far the best BC oriented binding I have ever used period. I preferred the X-2 because when I had the Switchback my other resort skis were mounted with Hammerheads #4 and I found it hard to go back and forth between such different levels of activity. YMMV on which one to choose.

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          • #6
            First of all, if you have questions about Burnt Mountain gear, don't hesitate to email or call Louis. Based on my experience, he will get back to you.

            I have 170 Vectors mounted with X2s. I like them. I also have Praxis BC skis mounted with NTN Spikes. I like those, too.

            The decisive advantage of the Spikes for me is the ability to use NTN boots, which ski better for me than T2 Ecos, I think because they flex more readily and more evenly. That's not relevant for you (unless you buy boots, too).

            Choosing between the two bindings to use with SynerGs is probably a question of personal preference. I think the weights are not far apart; the Spikes may be a bit lighter. The X2s have a straightforward, field repairable design; that's a plus. I can usually get in and out of the Spikes and switch between ski and walk mode without bending over, if that matters to you, but the price of that is more moving parts and some fiddle factor. The Spikes' rigid tube underfoot is probably a better design for lateral stability. My sense is that the low production volume of Spikes may make it harder to refine the materials and minimize the manufacturing tolerances, which may undercut design advantages and up the fiddle factor.

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            • #7
              fogey wrote,
              My sense is that the low production volume of Spikes may make it harder to refine the materials and minimize the manufacturing tolerances, which may undercut design advantages and up the fiddle factor.
              I think the materials are being refined all the time, and each binding is hand assembled. Every version of the binding has small, incremental improvements. One other point to remember is the ability to adjust the pivot point, where the heel tube meets the toe box. Spring tension, and even the individual springs (blue , green or red) can be fine tuned by Louis for the skiers weight, choice of boot, and boot size. Also with this binding it is easy to obtain parts, and the modular components are easily replaced.
              I only ski the NTN versions of the Spike Bulldogs, and with the wider toe box (as compared to the 75 mm version) I have been told, edge control is enhanced. Also with the NTN version, one can swap left and right skis for those icy runs, when inside edges have gotten dull.

              picture below, Spike binding toe cage being replaced. A quick 5 minute job with two 4mm hex wrenches.
              [IMG] Telebulldog binding on the bench[IMG] Spike 75mm binding without heel tube. Note the various holes for heel tube mounting, and binding overall "activity" at rear of toe cage
              Last edited by chamonix; 20 November 2013, 06:53 PM.

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              • #8
                I asked for a "heavy" touring binding - double tubes with the NTN toe. Really like the step-in with a very active binding. Very powerful. When I have had questions, Louis always got right back to me.

                I would buy another pair of Burnt Mt Spikes without out thinking.

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