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How To Remove Snow and Water Drops from the Inside of Goggle Lenses?

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  • How To Remove Snow and Water Drops from the Inside of Goggle Lenses?

    It's been a long time since I bought goggles, but I finally got some Smiths for flat light and snowing conditions. They come with a dire warning not to wipe the inside of the lens when it is wet or it will wreck the coating on the lens, or worse. They used to make some special sponge/chamois thing to blot up the water after you take a header in the powder and your goggles fill with snow. But those are now discontinued. How bad can it be to just wipe them off? If not OK wtf are they thinking making something that is going to get wet, one way or another, that you really need to see through, and that you cannot wipe off? Anybody know anything about this?

  • #2
    Heat, time and circulation; at least until they get old.

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    • #3
      You only get snow inside your goggles when you take them off. If you're wearing a helmut, it is pretty unlikely they will come off due to the fall. I put my goggles on when I'm stepping outside and don't take them off until I'm going inside.

      There are anit-fog products you can wipe on with a chamois that help some to prevent fogging, but they are not as good as the factory coating. Take good care of it and it will last a long time.

      Goggles and skin glue... keep them both out of the snow.

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      • #4
        This might depend on where you live but I had a pair that were soaked and I took the lens out and put it in the sun for a few days and they were fine afterwards.

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        • #5
          Hindfoot,

          I'm with you on the quandry of what to do if you DO get moisture (fog/snow/sweat) on the inside lens of your goggles. The manufacturers are in solidarity on this one, and adamant - let them dry, do NOT wipe them dry.

          Based on what they are saying, sounds like the solution is to knock off as much moisture as you can and then be patient, keeping them away from whatever might prevent them from drying. Obviously this will be a problem in the middle of a storm when you do a starfish turn and pack them with snow. Sounds kind of like free soloing where you are simply admonished - don't fall. Or in this case, don't contaminate the coating. Period.

          ain't no turn like tele!

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          • #6
            I agree with Hindfoot, they shouldn't make such candy-ass products. It's Unamericun. If you can't sit on it, wipe your nose with it, and clean it with an oily rag, it ain't worth a damn.

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            • #7
              Buy cheap googles and wipe as needed.

              Unless you never ski deep powder, never wipe out face-first in deep powder and never ski hard enough to sweat, you're going to have to clear your googles sooner or later. Stopping and waiting for the moisture to evaporate on it's own in the middle of a run is not a realistic option.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NoPin View Post
                Buy cheap googles and wipe as needed.

                Unless you never ski deep powder, never wipe out face-first in deep powder and never ski hard enough to sweat, you're going to have to clear your googles sooner or later. Stopping and waiting for the moisture to evaporate on it's own in the middle of a run is not a realistic option.
                Though it seems I'm endorsing the manufacturers perspective (above), I ain't! Just reiterating what Cesare said. Agree with you completely!

                The other option, the one that works for me, is to go full tilt and get the Smith Turbo Goggles. I can fog ANY pair of goggles. Some take longer, but it seems inevitable regardless of the model. EVEN turbo goggles. The reason I like the turbos? Despite being able to fog them up on occasion, they have the ability to unfog and clear themselves.

                ain't no turn like tele!

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                • #9
                  Glacier glasses/sunglasses with side shields are an alternative. They have more air circulation than goggles so don't often fog, and typically can be wiped with a soft cloth.

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                  • #10
                    30 bucks for a pair that you can wipe off...or the Turbos
                    Yay!...(Drool)


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cesare View Post
                      You only get snow inside your goggles when you take them off. If you're wearing a helmut, it is pretty unlikely they will come off due to the fall. I put my goggles on when I'm stepping outside and don't take them off until I'm going inside.

                      There are anit-fog products you can wipe on with a chamois that help some to prevent fogging, but they are not as good as the factory coating. Take good care of it and it will last a long time.

                      Goggles and skin glue... keep them both out of the snow.
                      Cesare, mainly good advice, thank you. Leaving goggles on full time may work for lift-served, but I can't imagine not taking helmet and goggles off for climbing. If I didn't I would be miserably hot and the goggles would surely get fogged.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dostie View Post
                        Hindfoot,

                        I'm with you on the quandry of what to do if you DO get moisture (fog/snow/sweat) on the inside lens of your goggles. The manufacturers are in solidarity on this one, and adamant - let them dry, do NOT wipe them dry.

                        Based on what they are saying, sounds like the solution is to knock off as much moisture as you can and then be patient, keeping them away from whatever might prevent them from drying. Obviously this will be a problem in the middle of a storm when you do a starfish turn and pack them with snow. Sounds kind of like free soloing where you are simply admonished - don't fall. Or in this case, don't contaminate the coating. Period.
                        Craig,
                        The dealer I asked about this yesterday said "No problem, just take them into the bathroom and use the warm air hand dryer to dry them." Hmmm.

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                        • #13
                          If I have a fall and load them up with snow I knock out as much as I can, then use a Smith Snow Eraser- first pressing the shammy side into the drops and then lightly wiping with the sponge side. Never scratched my 5+ y-o A-frames too badly, unless I just can't see too well anymore.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BillyFromTheHills View Post
                            30 bucks for a pair that you can wipe off...or the Turbos
                            The Lost & Found bin can also be a good source of cheap goggles. You just have to get there before the lifties and patrollers.

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                            • #15
                              Since it sounds like you're buying a NEW pair of goggles to replace something, why not carry BOTH pairs? Then you can let one dry out while you wear the other. I admit to doing this on occasion, usually the days when it is humid and nuking snow and I do not want to let stupid fogging or wet goggles screw up what should be fun skiing.

                              The dryer-in-the-bathroom ideas sounds like a good one, too.

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