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Transition from Duckbill to NTN help.

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  • #76
    Originally posted by nstelemark View Post
    Another way to put this is that NTN rewards good technique.
    Disagree respectfully. It rewards its own good technique, but the stacked stance on neutral 75mm would look and ski like an intermediate skier.

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    • #77
      This one was dropped in my lap last weekend.
      On a slope of moderate steepness practice side slipping in the Tele stance. Slow and controlled. It really forces you to find the perfect stance for the gear you're on.
      Lift served and proud of it.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by nstelemark View Post
        Another way to put this is that NTN rewards good technique.
        haha. Trying to start a flame war from yesteryear?

        Bottom line, NTN gear may require an adjustment in your technique. The clamp under the ball of your foot is extremely powerful. The adjustment may minor for some, significant for others. It's not necessarily about good technique, but the right technique for that gear. Plenty of folks rip it up with T1 boots and Targa bindings in a style that's noticeably different than those who ride NTN gear.

        Hafjell, good on you for persevering. Clearly, ski lessons via interweb are limited. In learning/adjusting, it goes and goes until something clicks. And then it opens up. Have fun.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by hafjell View Post
          Disagree respectfully. It rewards its own good technique, but the stacked stance on neutral 75mm would look and ski like an intermediate skier.
          I ski the same "stacked" way regardless of the equipment I'm on and I have done so tele for nearly forty years. I skied tall in 1979 and I ski tall today. I don't usually look like an intermediate skier or so I'm told. ;-)

          Good technique is not, in my opinion, dependent on equipment. [/ducks]

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          • #80
            Originally posted by nstelemark View Post
            Another way to put this is that NTN rewards good technique.
            Originally posted by hafjell View Post
            Disagree respectfully. It rewards its own good technique, but the stacked stance on neutral 75mm would look and ski like an intermediate skier.
            No, I don't ski different on NTN, HHs, O1s, Targas or pins. Bindings that are very active allow people to get away with poor technique but will still reward good technique. I liken skiing NTN to skiing on pins. The binding will do nothing to help the skier bend the sole and put pressure on the ski unless you use good technique to flex the boot sole instead of a bias force(springs) and a fulcrum that is farther back from the toe. NTN is quite neutral actually. Look at where the flex plate hinges, not other 75 mm binding save for pins has a pivot point that far forward. The toe bale actually pivots forward with the flex plate. Like pins, the skier has to do all the work to flex the boot sole. The springs just provide a bias(feedback) and add flex stiffness to the system.

            I think people get confused when it comes to "neutral/active" and "soft/stiff" when it comes to describing bindings. An active binding can be set up with a soft flex(HH 4/5 with soft springs) just like a neutral binding can be set up to have a stiff flex(Targa with WC springs).

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            • #81
              ^^^ what Arin said ^^^

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              • #82
                In Bill Clinton speak, I think it depends on your definition of same or different. When I take pins to the resort to screw around and ski with my kids, I have to work much harder to keep my knees together and stay balanced. It's good practice. I can be more lazy on Switchback X2s when it comes to keep my knees together (b/c they just don't spread as freely as I go down). And when I switch between original Switchbacks and the X2s, to me, it feels like I need to adjust for the gear. Overall, it's the same general principles and same motion, but there's a few awkward turns out of the gate before it feels comfortable. And that's also how it felt during the runs I've taken on NTN gear -- it reminded me of playing with the HH settings and going from 3 to 5.
                Last edited by dschane; 17 March 2015, 02:29 PM.

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                • #83
                  I just tried NTN for the first time this weekend and it went pretty well. This is my first year on tele gear... been skiing Axls on Surface Sherpas (pretty much a park ski re-branded to look like a touring ski) and T2 Ecos. My NTN setup consisted of Freerides, 190cm BD Verdicts, and TX Pros. I think I figured it out within the first couple of runs, thanks to this thread. Knowing to stay as compact as possible, to drop straight onto the rear foot, and to pressure the cuffs seemed to work really well... had to concentrate on those three things (which I suppose I should regardless) to not lose my trailing ski. I didn't adopt a knee-to-ski approach with the Axls, so that might've helped me out.

                  Here are a few clips... feel free to tell me what I could do better!

                  https://youtu.be/SenpG0dg6MI

                  And the setup:

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                  • #84
                    Stec06
                    Narrower stance? You don't need your trailing foot that far behind the other foot IMHO.
                    Nice snow, you have good balance. I am sure you will figure it out..

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                    • #85
                      steco6, you ski very well. Quite frankly you ski at a level that trying to nit pick what you are doing on an internet forum would not be very productive. If you really want to get better find a local high level ski instructor and have him help you.

                      To really help someone of your level I would want to know what your goals are and what you are working on with your skiing. I would want to watch you mkae a variety of turn shapes and see you ski in different conditions on different difficulty of runs. Then I would pick the one or may be two most important things I would like to see changed. The problem here is you will get a dozen different comments some will be good and some not so much and even if they were all good you can't work on a dozen different things at once.

                      Just my biased two cents.
                      Last edited by James; 29 March 2015, 08:43 PM.

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                      • #86
                        Good call. Once I get back to the States I'll hopefully link up with a tele instrcutor. I definitely noticed that I was throwing my trailing foot a little TOO far back in the vid. I've mostly been trying to get comfortable making tele turns on the steeps...

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                        • #87
                          Ok, here are my dozen tips

                          It looks like you have the skis very narrowly together. A bit more space between them makes it easier to get your edges into the snow and avoids the nasty habbit of the skis kissing each other. Feet at hip width is a good stance.

                          Often I see how your upper leg, in the back leg position, is pointing straight down. As far as I know it's hard to get any weight on your rear foot in that position. Shorten the distance between your feet. Easier said then done.

                          You have a bit of jerky turn initiation. All the action is in the first meter of the turn and the rest is static. A more smooth transition and going down for a longer time looks a lot better and feels better too.

                          I see these things because it is what I wrestle with too. So I also would like to see some ideas how to avoid above things. A good one for shortening your stance is pushing your pelvis forward.

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Kees View Post
                            Ok, here are my dozen tips

                            It looks like you have the skis very narrowly together. A bit more space between them makes it easier to get your edges into the snow and avoids the nasty habbit of the skis kissing each other. Feet at hip width is a good stance.
                            I agree with this comment along with the one Cham said but I don't think it would be a priority.

                            Originally posted by Kees View Post
                            Often I see how your upper leg, in the back leg position, is pointing straight down. As far as I know it's hard to get any weight on your rear foot in that position. Shorten the distance between your feet. Easier said then done.
                            I don't think the rear femur should be pointing straight down but I don't think stec06 has his femur straight down most of the time in the video. I also think that if you do have your femur straight down it would put more weight on the rear foot not less. You would be extending the hip joint to get your femur straight up and down and extending any joint in your leg is going to put more weight on that leg. I think if the hip joint was flexed more to get the rear femur/knee more forward more it would help narrow the stance like what Cham said.

                            Originally posted by Kees View Post
                            You have a bit of jerky turn initiation. All the action is in the first meter of the turn and the rest is static. A more smooth transition and going down for a longer time looks a lot better and feels better too.
                            Hard to say how someone would ski with a Gopro over their head. I was trying to make out the turn shape but had trouble figuring that out with the pole cam but I think you might have a point. Slowing down the lead change / shoulder movements and making more round turns would probably be the first thing I would want to look at.

                            Originally posted by Kees View Post
                            I see these things because it is what I wrestle with too. So I also would like to see some ideas how to avoid above things. A good one for shortening your stance is pushing your pelvis forward.
                            Pushing your pelvis / hips forward is a good way to shorten your stance. What body joints you change to do this is also important. I would focus on flexing your front ankle more to get your hips forward. Putting extra focus on weighting the ball of your rear foot is also likely to get you to move the rear foot forward to get more weight on it and be less tippy toe.
                            Last edited by James; 30 March 2015, 09:00 AM.

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by stec06 View Post
                              Good call. Once I get back to the States I'll hopefully link up with a tele instrcutor. I definitely noticed that I was throwing my trailing foot a little TOO far back in the vid. I've mostly been trying to get comfortable making tele turns on the steeps...
                              Just a hunch but: I strongly suspect that trying to film yourself with the pole-cam did not help your technique!

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                              • #90
                                Off topic: are you skiing in Georgia (the Caucasus)?

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