Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Transition from Duckbill to NTN help.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by hafjell View Post
    TX Pro's just arrived. Gorgeous. Fit like a glove. Scarpa NA ran out of my size so buying them locally wasn't possible. I'll pay a shop to heat the liners? What's reasonable to pay? Happy to give them the business. Next up: boards and bindings. Freedoms for the latter, and 105s for the former? Volkl Nunataqs?
    If they already fit like a glove , maybe you don't want to heat mould the liners ? That may just accelerate the packing out process .

    I would recommend green Superfeet footbeds and not full custom ones which provide too much support under the arch for Tele turns , IMO .

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by silow View Post
      If they already fit like a glove , maybe you don't want to heat mould [sic] the liners ? That may just accelerate the packing out process .
      Good advice.

      Originally posted by silow View Post
      I would recommend green Superfeet footbeds and not full custom ones which provide too much support under the arch for Tele turns , IMO .
      Bogus advice IMO. Having the "right" footbed is always a good idea. Superfeet tend to work for a lot of people, but the best one for your foot has less to do with color and more to do with the height of your arch, and position relative to the heel. Custom footbeds can be significantly better than stock, trim-to-fit footbeds provided they are molded correctly. That last part is an art and some fitters do it better than others, and even good boot fitters can have a bad day. So I categorically disagree with your sweeping statement that custom footbeds provide too much support under the arch for tele turns. The footbed is the foundation, and when done right, nothing beats a custom footbed. OTOH, a good approximation with a trim-to-fit footbed is typically much better than none. Beyond that, there are a lot of other ingredients that go into making a good fitting tele boot.
      Last edited by Dostie; 27 February 2015, 07:47 PM.

      ain't no turn like tele!

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by chamonix View Post
        You should put custom footbeds in your new TX Pros IMHO.
        I have had good luck with binding orders from T-P too. Did you have to pay any duty on the boots? Thinking of ordering a pair of TX Comps from T-P. No one in N.A. has my size in stock.
        I really like my Nunataqs, though mine are set up for AT with a set of Dynafit Verticals (also from T-P).
        I bought skis, boots and bindings from Telemark Pyrenees, and so far have not gotten a bill for import duties. My understanding is that it is somewhat random if they hit you up for it, and the amounts are low if they do. Service was great, and they mounted the bindings for free. Ordered on a Saturday, they shipped Monday and arrived Thursday, including a 1 day delay to the snowmageddon storm.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Dostie View Post
          Good advice.


          Bogus advice IMO. Having the "right" footbed is always a good idea. Superfeet tend to work for a lot of people, but the best one for your foot has less to do with color and more to do with the height of your arch, and position relative to the heel. Custom footbeds can be significantly better than stock, trim-to-fit footbeds provided they are molded correctly. That last part is an art and some fitters do it better than others, and even good boot fitters can have a bad day. So I categorically disagree with your sweeping statement that custom footbeds provide too much support under the arch for tele turns. The footbed is the foundation, and when done right, nothing beats a custom footbed. OTOH, a good approximation with a trim-to-fit footbed is typically much better than none. Beyond that, there are a lot of other ingredients that go into making a good fitting tele boot.
          Before I cooked mine, I skied half a day without any footbeds in. That turned out to be a mistake as one foot was in serious pain (I definitely need the orthotics). I have a full custom orthotic, and cooking the liners allowed for the orthotics to fit in the boot much better than just putting them in without heat molding. I don't notice any issues with making a tele turn with them in, and the boots definitely fit better.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by chamonix View Post
            You should put custom footbeds in your new TX Pros IMHO.
            I have had good luck with binding orders from T-P too. Did you have to pay any duty on the boots? Thinking of ordering a pair of TX Comps from T-P. No one in N.A. has my size in stock.
            I really like my Nunataqs, though mine are set up for AT with a set of Dynafit Verticals (also from T-P).
            No. And with an online password, they discounted the total sale 10% so shipping was free. From the TelPyr website, telemark boots are tax free.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Dostie View Post
              Custom footbeds can be significantly better than stock, trim-to-fit footbeds provided they are molded correctly. That last part is an art and some fitters do it better than others, and even good boot fitters can have a bad day.
              Dostie, what's your take on Cosmo in Truckee? Sorry if that's too direct. I had a good experience there but of course he's an alpine guy.

              Comment


              • #52
                I've heard good and bad reports on all the well known bootfitters in Truckee. Everyone I know has good days and bad days. The good bootfitters have more good days than bad. Whenever I've had a customer return with trouble, it is usually because they didn't convey an issue or pressure point they were experiencing, and nearly always they were not very good skiers and so they didn't actually know what to notice to communicate to me about what was wrong (or right). In those cases, the solution was to exchange for an oversized boot that felt more comfortable but would inevitably be too big. But they left smiling, so all's good, right?

                I have friends at the Start Haus (James, Jason, Doug) and Granite Chief (Darren, Gunner) and The Back Country (Herschel) who all do a great job. What they lack is on-slope proximity to confirm the fit immediately, and if it isn't right, to correct it the same day. Olympic Bootfitters at Squaw and Sako's Best Fit Boots at Sugar Bowl offer the ability to test the fit right away by skiing, and if you're planning to go backcountry, to do an in-bounds skinning "test" (not at Squaw though) to confirm the fit, or fix it the same day if more adjusting is required.

                Depending on what you need, the good folks at Alpenglow Sports in Tahoe City, Tahoe Mt. Sports in Truckee, or The Tahoe Hub in Truckee can help with cooking liners, but not punching or grinding.

                Sounds like you need a boot fitter that does good custom footbeds, but maybe not. Maybe you just need a good diagnosis on what part of your boots is troubling your feet, and the solution will make itself obvious if the problem is properly understood. I find it rare that a custom footbed completely fixes a problem, but it is usually an integral part of the solution.

                ain't no turn like tele!

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Dostie View Post


                  Bogus advice IMO. Having the "right" footbed is always a good idea. Superfeet tend to work for a lot of people, but the best one for your foot has less to do with color and more to do with the height of your arch, and position relative to the heel. Custom footbeds can be significantly better than stock, trim-to-fit footbeds provided they are molded correctly. That last part is an art and some fitters do it better than others, and even good boot fitters can have a bad day. So I categorically disagree with your sweeping statement that custom footbeds provide too much support under the arch for tele turns. The footbed is the foundation, and when done right, nothing beats a custom footbed. OTOH, a good approximation with a trim-to-fit footbed is typically much better than none. Beyond that, there are a lot of other ingredients that go into making a good fitting tele boot.
                  Ok , I agree with you , as long as he goes to see a good boot fitter .
                  My point is that lots of boot fitters may not know much about Telemark skiing , and will mould the footbed with too much support under the arch . As I flex onto my toes in my Tele boots , my arch changes a lot more than it would in alpine boots (flexing onto your toes is not something you do in alpine boots) .
                  I've had issues with too much support under the arch with custom footbeds in the past , maybe I went to see the wrong bootfitter .
                  I've been skiing with Superfeet for many years , I am very happy with them (I like the blue ones too) and they're a lot cheaper than custom footbeds .

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    silow,

                    Yeah, there's a lot that goes into a footbed and there are different techniques: weighted, unweighted, semi-weighted, neutral position, etc. It also depends how strongly a bootfitter makes the post, the underlying material that holds the foot in the proper position. Superfeet did/does a tremendous job of providing a foot support that really anchors your heel well, with typical average arch height with softer (blue) or more rigid (green) support depending on what is best for your foot and what you intend to do with it.

                    It sounds like you had a cork footbed made (just a guess) in a neutral position which maximizes the arch height and yields a footbed with very little give. That is part of the reason so many bootfitters are now doing semi-weighted casting so the arch isn't too strongly defined, but allows for a small, and natural amount of arch collapse as you walk.

                    I remember I had custom footbeds made on three successive trade show, with three different results (3 different operators). I concluded that the neutral position way of molding may be superior, but only if the fitter is truly experienced and an artist in the technique. In fact one pair, that I had retired, I recently put back into service when I realized it had been improperly finished. Since I've been doing some bootfitting myself, it was easy to correct the posting errors and they now sit inside my hiking boots.

                    ain't no turn like tele!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Dostie View Post
                      and nearly always they were not very good skiers and so they didn't actually know what to notice to communicate to me about what was wrong (or right). In those cases, the solution was to exchange for an oversized boot that felt more comfortable but would inevitably be too big. But they left smiling, so all's good, right?
                      People who are starting down the boot fitting road really need to take this advice to heart. Lots of folk are going to only be happy with boots that are too big. And conversely dialing the fit for a correctly sized shell is likely not going to be a one session solution.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Been saying this for years... thanks for supporting bootfitters!

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Skied my new 29.5 TX Pros with a borrowed pair of Freedom (blues) on 180 BD Verdicts. I struggled. HArd to engage the rear ski. Hard to get forward on the downhill/forward ski. Felt like I would get the hang of it eventually, but very wobbly. Rear ski had a mind of its own. Will reread this thread, but open to new advice as well. Heading out for at least one session today, tomorrow and Wednesday.

                          Also, no NTN bindings for sale in North Conway! Zero. Ragged, EMS and IME empty.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by hafjell View Post
                            Skied my new 29.5 TX Pros with a borrowed pair of Freedom (blues) on 180 BD Verdicts. I struggled. HArd to engage the rear ski. Hard to get forward on the downhill/forward ski. Felt like I would get the hang of it eventually, but very wobbly. Rear ski had a mind of its own. Will reread this thread, but open to new advice as well. Heading out for at least one session today, tomorrow and Wednesday.

                            Also, no NTN bindings for sale in North Conway! Zero. Ragged, EMS and IME empty.

                            Well.... do you want the physics explanation of why it feels different, or the adjustment to your technique so you can feel your back foot engage more powerfully???
                            the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by tele.skier View Post
                              Well.... do you want the physics explanation of why it feels different, or the adjustment to your technique so you can feel your back foot engage more powerfully???
                              Both, please. But if you're short on time, the latter.

                              Day two was better. Still wobbly, still can't get as much separation between my feet fore-to-aft, but it's more stable, and the rear foot is tracking a bit more.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                You want less not more separation fore and aft. Drop your center of mass directly over the ball of your rear foot and don't forget to edge it.

                                If you are used to using the boot as a lever, you will have to change your habits because that is a recipe for hating the NTN.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X