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  • Show me your wood

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    two cords, one walnut (gorgeous heavy stuff!) and one pine/fir. $580 delivered (I don't chop wood anymore....)

    stacked in two and a half rows

  • #2
    Nice socks.

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    • #3
      Jeece Baab, you would fit in with the geezers I ski with....(I include myself in that!).....Thinking about doing a piece on Geezer skiers..... Course telekid, Telesven, Rastatele, Telewood would be excluded....not geezer enough....They need some seasoning....Like wood....Have cut and stacked three cords but have not split anything....That comes in October....And CD, how about Ron posting some pictures....He knows wood!!!!! TM

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      • #4
        I cut (not chop) my own, and the price of the two cords above seemed pretty high so I looked up prices locally. Come to find that $600 delivered for 2 cords of good wood isn't out of line. Stuff's gotten spendy. Guess it's time to go get some non-ethanol fuel for the fall cut.

        And yeah, socks?
        backcountry in northern New Mexico

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        • #5
          Hey Baaahb, buy another cord and start a band.



          Get it? 3 cords...3 chords...garage band...baaahb and the socks...

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          • #6
            Baab if you had cut and split all that on your own I would be more impressed with your socks...

            Got a a pal up country who felled, bucked and stacked 12 cords in a week last month. He has also won the Alaska Wilderness Classic Winter a couple time. I used to do 8 chords a winter on my own. Really hard work even using my work snow machine and sled. Then I discovered Toyostoves along with more ski time.

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            • #7
              $600. Wow! You 'merkins have way too much money. I paid $320 CDN for two cords of fir/larch mix, split and delivered.

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              • #8
                If you look at the pic closely, you'll see those socks have a reinforced toe.

                I can't imagine splitting oak or walnut by hand, that would be a lot of work. Compared to other things one pays for, the price seems reasonable. Oak is going for $400 or more a cord, when you can find it.
                Last edited by Baaahb; 31 August 2014, 08:39 PM.

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                • #9
                  Usually get six cords of wood delivered @600$....Log length, I do the cutting Rastatele gets a splitter....This year fell apart so doing it on my own....Bummer.... but it is good for conditioning. The delivered wood generally has beech, rock maple, ash, yellow birch, red maple....Pretty good stuff...TM

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Teleman View Post
                    Usually get six cords of wood delivered @600$....Log length, I do the cutting Rastatele gets a splitter....This year fell apart so doing it on my own....Bummer.... but it is good for conditioning. The delivered wood generally has beech, rock maple, ash, yellow birch, red maple....Pretty good stuff...TM
                    Gramps, you live where there's some great firewood species! Out west, a lot of people are pretty clueless about how poor most of their wood is for use as firewood... It's pretty sad when the local people selling firewood are trying to pass of cottonwood and hemlock as firewood.

                    I've been lucky some years and less lucky others. I have burned a few old cedar decks, and a few solid red oak floors along with my "chopped" wood. Last year I got a few white birch logs late in the summer, split the hell out of them so they would dry faster and they burned nicely. I also had a beech tree that was a non-native ornimental that the city of seattle cut next to my friends house and he grabbed for me. Of course that coaled up nicely.

                    This year I have a chord of apple which is loaded with moss... I thought about pressure washing it before split and stacking, but I didn't do it. Some of that apple tree was so twisty that I just cut it into chunks on my resaw bandsaw, rather than try to split it *(which is impossible) It did have some nice burl on it. I was thinking of resawing some of it and making a picture frame for a psycodelic hendryx poster I have...

                    I have about 2.5 chords this year. I should have more, but I am picky about not wasting my time hauling and cutting $hitty firewood. I have a neighbor who has some sort of connection and every year he gets hardwood rounds dumped next to his shed a few times each summer... I don't know if he buys it or has a good connection with an arborist who treats him well...

                    Back in New York, I lived 2 miles from our log dump where we milled logs for furniture lumber. There was always a lot of good firewood to haul away for free. Plenty of ash, which is primo firewood and always seemed to have some poison ivy on it.. (which I get pretty easily)

                    I'm ready for the colder weather and the snow. I hope I got the apple wood split and stacked early enough for it to burn decently. I have some very dry oak flooring to mix in with it so I bet it will work out ok..

                    No pictures......
                    Last edited by tele.skier; 1 September 2014, 09:27 AM.
                    the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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                    • #11
                      Well here is the last of my (3) wood piles. Click image for larger version

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ID:	82146This wood, hard woods, maple, was left over from building a pad for my new garage last summer. Now I have to move, and stack it before the snow flies.

                      Wood stove is cleaned and ready.Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by chamonix View Post
                        Now I have to move, and stack it before the snow flies.
                        Smart people try to handle each piece as few times as possible. Wood, the fuel that warms you more times than once.
                        "Nobody ever got my name right." - Me

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                        • #13
                          Here are My 3 cords, thigly packed.
                          Click image for larger version

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                          AbsoluteTelemark.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rene-Martin View Post
                            Here are My 3 cords, thigly packed.
                            [ATTACH=CONFIG]3501[/ATTACH]
                            So that's how they do it on the other side of the Poutine Curtain. Personally, I would hate having to crawl under there to store it and then again to retrieve it. If there are three chords under there it must go pretty far back. Hopefully you have some short people (kids) to do that for you?
                            "Nobody ever got my name right." - Me

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                            • #15
                              TS that Apple wood makes for outstanding cooking wood.....When they die on my land I stack them for broiling....But it makes for excellent heating wood....If you get uh...burls save them...I take dead Apple and make a "work in progress" of intertwined limbs for visuals that please me....after a few years they are something different....TM

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