Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dupre's skis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dupre's skis

    I came across this video of Lonnie Dupre custom making his own skis in preparation for a solo winter ascent of Denali. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIkdwJF8BI0 Very long and wide for flotation on snowbridges over crevasses, with his climbing skins drilled onto them. Since there are some expert woodworkers on here, can someone explain what he's doing? Like, why are they clamped flat at the start, what's going on with the scraping immediately after that and why do they start to bend when he does it, how's he getting that complicated profile from the side, and what kind of stuff is he slathering on?

  • #2
    Originally posted by xmatt View Post
    I came across this video of Lonnie Dupre custom making his own skis in preparation for a solo winter ascent of Denali. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIkdwJF8BI0 Very long and wide for flotation on snowbridges over crevasses, with his climbing skins drilled onto them. Since there are some expert woodworkers on here, can someone explain what he's doing? Like, why are they clamped flat at the start, what's going on with the scraping immediately after that and why do they start to bend when he does it, how's he getting that complicated profile from the side, and what kind of stuff is he slathering on?
    Matt, my guesses, educated or less: 1. May not be flat at start. May be canted to start shaving (uses a spokeshave) lengthwise for thinner edges. 2. Scraping is shaping with the spokeshave for core profile (though "core" is entirety of the ski). 3. I'd say he is steam bending the wood, though right before putting onto the rack to set the tip bend and camber, the wood looks to come out of a bath, so maybe hot water after steam. 3. Slather stuff is no doubt epoxy, but with apparent stiffness shown in his stir, it would be thickened. Not best for penetration in wood. OTOH, I've often imagined a pair of dirtbag, quick make/short life skis that had a base that wasn't ptex, but....epoxy! (easily re-applied) Since he has most of the base covered by skin, I think I talked my self into concluding that's the case. It will be a traditional/crafty climb, if not lightweight.
    Last edited by Charley White; 27 April 2022, 11:23 AM.
    nee, Whiteout

    Comment


    • #3
      Any idea what kind of boots those are? I would enjoy learning more about both the boots and skis.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by fisheater View Post
        Any idea what kind of boots those are? I would enjoy learning more about both the boots and skis.
        They don't appear to have duckbills but possibly have been ground into a 75 mm shape. I don't understand how they can be secure in the X2s.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd say those boots can be secure in the X2's just like they can be secure in rigid crampons - which they are meant to be, as mountaineering boots. But maybe not "secure" in the sense of Solid for excellent control of the skis. I will guess that these babies are for the approach and he does not intend to ski down much of anything on them. Also will guess that there was no steaming involved, just hot water. I have bent smaller pieces of wood that way, you can't get as hot as with steam, and thus less pliable, but these bends are quite gentle so a hot water soak would get you there just fine.
          If you've ever watched any video or seen photos on the making of traditional Saami or Altai skis, he's doing just what those guys do, only he's using modern climbing skins instead of reindeer fur or sealskin, and putting a modern binding on them, and sealing them with epoxy - yes, I second Charley's opinion that is epoxy going on there. But I hope he knows to go over the epoxy with a UV inhibiting polyurethane, since most epoxies are damaged by UV and need a topcoat to protect them from it.

          Comment

          Working...
          X