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(Long) approach shoe options for skiing?

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  • (Long) approach shoe options for skiing?

    I usually just wear old running shoes when getting to turns involves a significant scramble on dry ground. I am wondering if there may be a better option. Lightness, traction, pack-ability, and the ability to keep loose rocks, sand & dirt out of the shoe are some of the desired characteristics. Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Do you have hiking shoes or boots that you like? If not, find some that fit well - that's the most important thing. There're a lot of shoes out there and until you know what fits, you're just gonna get a lot of "I love my Xxxxx..." answers from people whose feet may well be entirely different from yours.
    Last edited by televisionary; 17 September 2013, 03:17 PM.
    backcountry in northern New Mexico

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    • #3
      I've never found anything to work better for me than running shoes. I wear running shoes all the time unless I am barefoot or wearing ski boots. La Sportiva C-Lites are great in mud and also at keeping sand and gravel out. They are on the narrow side but they break down and conform to any foot pretty fast.
      Last edited by cesare; 17 September 2013, 10:05 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cesare View Post
        I've never found anything to work better for me than running shoes. I wear running shoes all the time unless I am barefoot or wearing ski boots. La Sportiva C-Lites are great in mud and also at keeping sand and gravel out. They are on the narrow side but they break down and conform to any foot pretty fast.
        I'm pretty much the same way. Asics gel kahana is my poison. Best in value/quality/preferred usage as far as I'm concerned. Of course, your method may vary.

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        • #5
          I always used Kayanos--for both XC training back in the day, and general light hiking/running.

          I did the Evolution Loop in these in August: http://www.backpacker.com/gear-guide...ots/gear/17361

          I seriously can't recommend them enough. No blisters, great support, and they grip quite solidly. Not like 5.10s, but you can definitely scramble in them.

          I was meaning to put up a review on my blog, but, once again, I got lazy.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cesare
            La Sportiva C-Lites are great
            Plus one for these. They've been my go to the last few years.

            Before that the Exum Pro/Ridge
            But, since they don't make those anymore LightRanger's recommendation seems great and quite similar.
            Originally posted by LightRanger
            I did the Evolution Loop in these in August: http://www.backpacker.com/gear-guide...ots/gear/17361

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            • #7
              when the tread on your soles runs low, i'd recommend sending the shoes to someplace like berkeley resoles and have them resoled with 5.10 dot rubber.

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              • #8
                On every pair of running shoes I've ever owned (a lot) the upper is completely toast before the soles are worn enough to think about resoling. YMMV.

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                • #9
                  There are lots and lots of approach shoe options these days. If you haven't already, you might want to see how you like them compared to running shoes. Not being a runner, I'll stay out of that comparison--I suspect the basic tradeoff is weight (lighter for running shoes) vs. support and, depending on the approach shoe soles, traction. I just picked up a sale pair of La Sportiva Boulder X's, which have high tops and Gore-Tex. They're intended for backpacking/scrambling but if the "dry ground" isn't all dry they might come in handy for ski approaches--weigh about 17 oz/shoe.

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                  • #10
                    I've walked many miles in my old T-2's, on the High Route for example, but have recently walked 8 miles and 2200 ft (twice, on the way in and out) on a multi-day trip using Garmont Sticky Lizard. I chose the Garmont's (Scott?) because I owned them and they were well broken in. YMMV
                    Originally posted by riser3
                    I heart filthy, stinky "hippies", although isn't mchin a Doctor or something like that? Hardly qualifies as a "hippie" IMHO...

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                    • #11
                      i don't know about the garmont sticky lizards, but the old garmont sticky weekends had a reputation for lasting for a very long time as the do everything outdoors shoe. the uppers held up to a lot of abuse, through multiple resoles. this has also been the shared experience of myself and several friends. however, i would not consider them a running shoe.

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                      • #12
                        I like my Asolo Fugitive GTX boots.
                        Had them for almost ten years. Extremely light and comfy.

                        Coastal Crest Snow Patrol
                        https://brentheffner.smugmug.com/
                        http://www.youtube.com/user/MrJibmstr
                        https://www.strava.com/athletes/1816044

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