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Wildsnow - Fish Scales & Lynx

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  • Wildsnow - Fish Scales & Lynx

    Check out this recent article.

    https://www.wildsnow.com/28866/tele-...ro/#more-28866

  • #2
    If it's quick transitions and touring ability he's looking for, he picked the right ski, but I suspect a TTS with F1/F3 boots would really make him happy. Of course, it's hard to justify writing an article about a boot that hasn't been sold new in 10 years.

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    • #3
      Great sign. Even if this is the rare bi-yearly telemark article from Wild Snow. Getting the word out on tele tech to the ski masses is great.

      More people on tele tech is obviously a good thing for the growth of the technology. And it's easy to forget sometimes (for people like us on these forums especially) that most telemark skiers - let alone skiers in general - still don't know or understand telemark tech. I didn't until about April of 2020.

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      • #4
        I had to jump in and make a few comments. I probably should've included a humble thank you for showing telemark tech to that crowd. But there were some goofy parts of the article.

        He compared the Lynx's weight per pair (1000g) to Dynafit bindings' individual weights (365g). In reality, 500g is pretty close to 365g. Obviously just a typo or editing error, but it changes dramatically how a potential customer would perceive the binding.

        I liked how the author evoked transitioning up-to-down in mountain biking. He wrote about how a setup with minimal fussing will allow him to ski little shots that he otherwise wouldn't ski if he had to do an involved transition (essentially, fat-ski meadow-skipping). But in reality, there are better tools for this than the Lynx. Going from downhill mode to walk mode requires stepping fully out -- which can be a pain to do repeatedly in the deep/soft snow that he is seeking. A TTS lets you switch modes with a simple flick of the heel lever. Like jtb said, there's not a good boot to go with TTS presently, but a TX Pro + TTS would still be better for that particular use than a TX Pro + Lynx.

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        • #5
          When you are a devotee to any particular niche interest, it's painful to read someone outside the niche try to get all their info right when they write their article. It's never the same for me as reading an article from an expert which gets all the facts right and all the subtle nuances too. The people in the comment section seemed to recognize that the Txpro is a less than awesome boot...


          Wild snow is a good site, but their telemark cred is less than expert... As was said, it is nice to see them recognized something other than AT gear as viable options to recreational touring...


          *And to add to what Bobby said,... Please writers stop telling us how much time we waste in "transitions"... and how that's such a huge issue for BC skiers. I take my skis off to rip my skins... I usually eat something, take a drink of water,... I don't ski with people in a hurry. It's NOT a race to me.
          Last edited by tele.skier; 5 January 2021, 02:46 PM.
          the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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          • #6
            This article wasn't written for diehards as it isn't on a dedicated telemark site. And telemark needs more of that. Wrapping your brain around a lot of the gear is daunting. Especially when it's a mix of brand new, high performance, wild sh!t like Lynx, and then other people telling you to get the sh!ttiest gear possible to learn on. That confusion we sow is not good for getting new people into the sport. The industry and culture needs to move past that dissonance.

            The writers should get things right. But if you're green and interested in telemark you wouldn't know what the nuance is anyways. It would go over your head. All you'd want to know is if it's rad. Lynx is the best hope to grow telemark right now. And an article on WildSnow is a great platform to broadcast the product.

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            • #7
              I think one thing the article gets right is that having extremely fast/easy transitions can affect the quality, not just the quantity, of the terrain you ski (with a good analogy to MTB). Yes, if you're doing one or two long uphill climbs followed by a descent, it doesn't matter if you grip and rip or take 10 minutes to enjoy the scenery. But with my Voile BC/TTS setup, I'll go out with my mom on her XC skis, get out ahead of her, and climb a hill to get a few turns. Or on a tour, I'll pick the descent with fresh snow and a rolling runout rather then the tracked out run that goes directly back to the trailhead.

              Anyway, different horses for different courses, but I'm coming around to the belief that NTN is for the resort and TTS is for the backcountry. I know others will disagree, but my TR2-based TTS makes me think there's still a lot of opportunity for development in TTS. The only question is if there are enough customers to justify it. I guess it's possible that Scarpa comes out with a kick-ass NTN touring boot, and someone irons out all of the touring issues with the bindings first, effectively killing TTS. But so far, neither Scarpa, Lynx, or Meidjo have done it, despite a lot of effort. Meanwhile many people are happily touring with their unmodified, 10 year old F1/F3 boots and a dead simple binding.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JackO View Post
                This article wasn't written for diehards as it isn't on a dedicated telemark site. And telemark needs more of that. Wrapping your brain around a lot of the gear is daunting. Especially when it's a mix of brand new, high performance, wild sh!t like Lynx, and then other people telling you to get the sh!ttiest gear possible to learn on. That confusion we sow is not good for getting new people into the sport. The industry and culture needs to move past that dissonance.

                The writers should get things right. But if you're green and interested in telemark you wouldn't know what the nuance is anyways. It would go over your head. All you'd want to know is if it's rad. Lynx is the best hope to grow telemark right now. And an article on WildSnow is a great platform to broadcast the product.
                All really good points.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bobbytooslow View Post
                  Going from downhill mode to walk mode requires stepping fully out
                  I disagree here... you can spin laps without ever needing to step out with the lynx. you can reach down and flick the claw back easily... definitely more involved than the TTS heel lever flick, but i haven't ever needed to fully step out of the binding to transition with the lynx, top or bottom of the run.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by QuentonCassidy View Post
                    I disagree here... you can spin laps without ever needing to step out with the lynx.
                    That's great to hear! Definitely contrary to the promotional material out there. This would certainly be a selling point over the Meidjo for folks who do lots of ups and downs.

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                    • #11
                      Pattern base skis- meadow skipping zone
                      4 buckle boots- Resort zone
                      Powerful free pivoting NTN binding- Backcountry descending zone

                      It seemed like a weird combination of components to review to me... Mostly, the pattern based ski choice says a wide variety of terrain, not just climb up/ski down to me, and the 4 buckle boots would be less and less my boot choice the more that the choice of a pattern base became the better choice of ski... So it struck me as an odd combo. The lynx is certainly versitile enough to work everywhere...

                      Scarpa doesn't make a touring tele boot anymore in NTN, so the review of the rig in question, doesn't have an appropriate boot really... IMO
                      the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by telenerd View Post
                        Just saw that..Wow ! On Wild Snow. I always thought Lou Dawson was a tele hater ?

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                        • #13
                          I read the article and the comments and for the most part I thought it was a positive. However, the author should have fact checked a little better and pretty obvious he has experience backcountry skiing but has little experience with this type of gear. I didn't like the pilling on dissing the boots as the bottomline is that if you want to move to pin telemark then you only have basically one popular choice that you can actually buy. Go to the trailheads where skiers are skiing moderate to big mountain and see that the majority of skiers are touring on 4 buckle boots so having a 4 buckle boot on a Vector BC is maybe a little overkill but very doable and maybe preferred.

                          WTBS, I have a ton of time on Voile BC skis and that's all I use. Did a cat trip last year on big mountain with others and I had no problem staying up or down on scales. I have both AT and tele setups on scales and I think tele overall works better even so it is heavier. The main difference for me is the release factor. I like the simple 75mm free pivot and T2's just for the fact that it tour great and light enough. I was impressed with jtb's TTS setup. Not impressed with the icing problems of the NTN and pin setups. The big boots wouldn't be a problem for me.

                          Edit to add, to climb anything worthy, you need to have wall to wall skins
                          Last edited by Quadzilla; 6 January 2021, 09:49 AM.
                          "Just say no to groomed snow"

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                          • #14
                            I continue to be intrigued by the fish scales on voile skis as a meadow skipping tool. I have never meadow skipped, but I imagine it to be quite freeing. Part of the problem has been a lack of confidence in selecting the right gear (or existence of the right gear). After reading this, I am thinking a slightly wider ski might help. Previously I was thinking narrow... but narrow would sink too much and be too slow on a gentle grade. Thoughts on ideal width UF?

                            That new voile pin binding might actually be good too. Although I think I want a little resistance like any xc ski setup, there is no free pivot. A binding that you don't even change for the ups and downs.

                            The Lynx can be switched to tour from ski without removing the binding BTW. This was noted in the comments as well. tip of the pole can disengage the butt clasp.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Quadzilla View Post
                              I didn't like the pilling on dissing the boots as the bottomline is that if you want to move to pin telemark then you only have basically one popular choice that you can actually buy.
                              This is correct, of course. And certainly in telemark-centric forums, that dead horse is beaten beyond recognition. But in places like Wild Snow, where telemark is a distant memory to most readers, the boot-"piling-on" does serve a purpose.

                              Number one, it helps remind folks from the industry who might be reading that yes, there is a lot of thirst out there for touring-optimized tele boots (something they might not be full aware of if they only see AT-centric content). Secondly, it helps make it clear that telemarkers are not just a bunch of beardo-weirdos content to shuffle along on whatever impractical gear exists; there are many who want to move well on the up & the down, just like ATers (perception of telemarkers by the "cool kids" is one thing that helped hasten its decline). Third, it lets potential pin telemark buyers know that things are moving in a positive direction, that the bindings have already taken some big steps, and that if you can deal with imperfect boots for a year or two, something swell should be along soon enough.

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