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Old Rotte Freeride question

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  • Old Rotte Freeride question

    I just scored some new-to-me skis for the great price of free. They have inserts for 22D bindings. I am trying to keep the overall price as close to free as possible, but need bindings. I have a pair of skis that I never use mounted with old Rotte Freerides, and I thought maybe I could move the mounting plate over. The awesome cesare has been my spiritual advisor in this process, and pointed me to this page: https://earnyourturns.com/wp-content...12_comparo.pdf (thanks Dostie!). Which makes it seem like my idea is a no-go, because I'd have to move the bindings too far back or forward.

    But I notice that says Freerides > 2012. And my Freeride plate is the original metal one, circa 2008 maybe? How does that mounting pattern differ?

    And I also just realized that with the 3 positions for placing the binding on the plate (I think the positions are 1.5cm apart, IIRC), could I mount the metal plate so as to miss the 22D insert holes, but then position the binding forward or back to make up for that?

  • #2
    My advice is simple...

    1) place the boot on the ski where you want it to end up once it's mounted in the binding.

    2)Transfer the boot center line to the ski with a marker

    3)Put the boot in the binding and locate it on the ski so the boot center of the boot aligns with the boot center mark you made on the ski

    4)Mark the front and rear of the binding on the ski.

    5)Remove the boot from the binding, then lay the binding on it's edge next to the ski in line with the front and back binding location marks you made.

    6)Eyeball the alignment of those existing binding holes with the holes in the base plate attached to the binding laying next to the ski. You could get lucky and it's good!

    7)Disconnect the base plate from the binding and lay it in place on the ski where you've determined it's location should be with your "eyeball" and mark the base plate's location.

    8)Manuver the base plate to avoid the existing holes from the previous binding, then measure how far off you need to be from your desired mounting point to have good solid meat to drill for the new baseplate screws.

    9) You have 1/2" that you can move the plate either forward or back to locate your boot exactly where you want it, by using the back or front mounting lug in the base plate..

    10)So, you have 3 positions of the base plate location to check for your exact chosen boot location, and then after you've exhausted those choices, then you are "cheating" your preferred boot location position so you get virgin locations for the screws for the new plate.

    I have those screws if you need them... I hope that's clearly stated...
    Last edited by tele.skier; 24 September 2020, 09:55 AM.
    the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, that's good advice. Unfortunately, I don't have the skis in my grubby little hands yet (and don't know for sure when I will) so am trying to preemptively find my answer. But what you describe makes a lot of sense.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll be the snarky one . . . get your hands on some Outlaw Xs if you can. They ski great and tour great. I've heard the brakes aren't as good as the Rotte breaks but leashes are how you work your tele poseur status.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dschane View Post
          I'll be the snarky one . . . get your hands on some Outlaw Xs if you can. They ski great and tour great. I've heard the brakes aren't as good as the Rotte breaks but leashes are how you work your tele poseur status.
          I totally understand that answer. But a) **** leashes, and b) I'm broke and can't afford Outlaws. I only grabbed the skis because they were free.

          Comment


          • #6
            Good God you're old, Danno! You can always ask your partners to hook and unhook your leashes. And if you gave up cable TV for a month you'd have your Outlaw Xs. ;-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tele.skier View Post
              My advice is simple...

              1) place the boot on the ski where you want it to end up once it's mounted in the binding.

              2)Transfer the boot center line to the ski with a marker

              3)Put the boot in the binding and locate it on the ski so the boot center of the boot aligns with the boot center mark you made on the ski

              4)Mark the front and rear of the binding on the ski.

              5)Remove the boot from the binding, then lay the binding on it's edge next to the ski in line with the front and back binding location marks you made.

              6)Eyeball the alignment of those existing binding holes with the holes in the base plate attached to the binding laying next to the ski. You could get lucky and it's good!

              7)Disconnect the base plate from the binding and lay it in place on the ski where you've determined it's location should be with your "eyeball" and mark the base plate's location.

              8)Manuver the base plate to avoid the existing holes from the previous binding, then measure how far off you need to be from your desired mounting point to have good solid meat to drill for the new baseplate screws.

              9) You have 1/2" that you can move the plate either forward or back to locate your boot exactly where you want it, by using the back or front mounting lug in the base plate..

              10)So, you have 3 positions of the base plate location to check for your exact chosen boot location, and then after you've exhausted those choices, then you are "cheating" your preferred boot location position so you get virgin locations for the screws for the new plate.

              I have those screws if you need them... I hope that's clearly stated...
              And if that doesn't work try recreational drinking and music videos.



              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cesare View Post
                Good God you're old, Danno! You can always ask your partners to hook and unhook your leashes. And if you gave up cable TV for a month you'd have your Outlaw Xs. ;-)
                I don't have cable TV!

                And even if I did, wouldn't I have to give it up for several months?

                But I don't so it's a moot point.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Danno View Post

                  I don't have cable TV!

                  And even if I did, wouldn't I have to give it up for several months?
                  That's lattes.

                  Two months of high-end Cable TV is probably $300. But I'm talking out of my arse.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dschane View Post
                    Two months of high-end Cable TV is probably $300. But I'm talking out of my arse.
                    No wonder I don't have cable TV!



                    Don't drink lattes either.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Then yer just gonna have to put the kid to work. She has an entrepreneurial bent. Isn't she old enough to be supporting her dad yet? ;-) jk...

                      Somebody must have some used ones for half price or less. I don't know the difference in mounting pattern but it wouldn't surprise me if it conflicts as much as the two positions for 22 Designs do with the newer Freeride pattern. And I do have enough time on the Freeride and the Oultaw X to know that I prefer the way the Outlaw X skis a lot more.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Freeride sucks. Heavy, clunky and they chew up your boots. I sold all of mine. Freedom is pretty good, Outlaw better. But I don't tour on these heavier bindings..
                        Some people like the Freeride for the edge control, but IMHO you can get the same edge control on the Outlaws (I don't have the Outlaw X).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I like the Freeride because I already own it!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            All the underfoot claw bindings have good edge control sensitivity. The freerides are pretty neutral by comparison to the later model NTNs. More powerfully active bindings have been the choice of many skiers since the HH days, and the NTN era is no different. I ski freerides inbounds. They work for me fine, but I'm not looking for any binding generated leverage. I actually like to weakly sprung feel of the freerides because they are still laterally pretty stiff. I wouldn't say they "suck", but I understand why skiers prefer the training wheels effect of more powerful bindings...🏔
                            the fall line is your friend.... resistance is futile

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tele.skier View Post
                              All the underfoot claw bindings have good edge control sensitivity. The freerides are pretty neutral by comparison to the later model NTNs. More powerfully active bindings have been the choice of many skiers since the HH days, and the NTN era is no different. I ski freerides inbounds. They work for me fine, but I'm not looking for any binding generated leverage. I actually like to weakly sprung feel of the freerides because they are still laterally pretty stiff. I wouldn't say they "suck", but I understand why skiers prefer the training wheels effect of more powerful bindings...🏔
                              You are confusing "binding generated leverage" with a loose fit in the toe box.

                              To elaborate, I found, the Freerides, had a dead spot compared to the Freedoms, and Outlaws. As you raise your heel, with the Freeride, nothing happens (so to speak) for about 3/4 of an inch until the toe starts to engage. The Freedom, on the other hand, has an elegant, upward curved toe box, so as you raise your heel , in a turn you get instant response from your ski. The Freedom binding also sits closer to the ski topskin. Just a better "sensitivity" to make Telemark turns IMHO. The Outlaw also has a curved-upward -towards-the toe design too.
                              Last edited by chamonix; 26 September 2020, 08:43 PM.

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